June 27, 2004

Torture is Legal for Americans

The New York Times > International > Middle East > Aides Say Memo Backed Coercion for Qaeda Cases

Version traduite de la page http://www.nytimes.com/2004/06/27/international/middleeast/27MEMO.html?hp=

June 27, 2004


Aides Say Memo Backed Coercion for Qaeda Cases
By DAVID JOHNSTON and JAMES RISEN

ASHINGTON, June 26 — An August 2002 memo by the Justice Department that concluded interrogators could use extreme techniques on detainees in the war on terror helped provide an after-the-fact legal basis for harsh procedures used by the C.I.A. on high-level leaders of Al Qaeda, according to current and former government officials.


The legal memo was prepared after an internal debate within the government about the methods used to extract information from Abu Zubaydah, one of Osama bin Laden's top aides, after his capture in April 2002, the officials said. The memo provided a legal foundation for coercive techniques used later against other high-ranking detainees, like Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, believed to be the chief architect of the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, who was captured in early 2003.


The full text of the memo was made public by the White House on Tuesday without explanation about why it was written or whether its standards were applied. Until now, it has not been clear that the memo was written in response to the C.I.A.'s efforts to extract information from high-ranking Qaeda suspects, and was unrelated to questions about handling detainees at Guantánamo Bay or in Iraq.


The memo suggested that the president could authorize a wide array of coercive interrogation methods in the campaign against terrorism without violating international treaties or the federal torture law. It did not specify any particular procedures but suggested there were few limits short of causing the death of a prisoner. The methods used on Mr. Zubaydah and other senior Qaeda operatives stirred controversy in government counterterrorism circles and concern over whether C.I.A. employees might be held liable for violating the federal torture law.


While the memo appeared to give the C.I.A. wide latitude in adopting tactics to interrogate high-level Qaeda detainees, it is still unclear exactly what procedures were used or the extent to which the memo influenced the government's overall thinking about interrogations of other terror detainees captured in Afghanistan and elsewhere.


The officials said the memo illustrated that the Bush administration, in the months after the September 2001 attacks, was urgently looking for ways to force senior Qaeda detainees to disclose whether they knew of any future terrorist attacks planned against the United States.


The memo, which is dated Aug. 1, 2002, was a seminal legal document guiding the government's thinking on interrogation. It was disavowed earlier this week by senior legal advisers to the Bush administration who said the memo would be reviewed and revised because it created a false impression that torture could be legally defensible.


In repudiating the memo in briefings this week, none of the senior Bush legal advisers whom the White House made available to reporters would discuss who had requested that the memo be prepared, why it had been prepared or how it was applied. On Friday, the Justice Department and C.I.A. would not discuss the origins of the memo, but in the past officials at those agencies have said that the interrogation techniques used on detainees were lawful and did not violate the torture statute, which generally forbids inflicting severe and prolonged pain.


The memo was addressed to Alberto R. Gonzales, the White House counsel, and signed by Jay S. Bybee, then the head of the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel. It said the document was an effort to define "standards of conduct" under international treaties and federal law. The memo concluded that a coercive procedure could not be considered torture unless it caused pain equivalent to that accompanying "serious physical injury, such as organ failure, impairment of bodily function or even death."


The Justice Department was asked to prepare the memo about the time of Mr. Zubaydah's capture in April 2002, the officials said, in an effort to clarify the permissible limits of interrogation because of questions raised by the treatment of Mr. Zubaydah and a few other Qaeda operatives then in custody. It remains unclear what role Attorney General John Ashcroft played in the debate over interrogation techniques or in the preparation of the memo, but Justice Department officials said he did not review it before it was sent to the White House.


Mr. Zubaydah, who managed Al Qaeda's worldwide recruiting system for Mr. bin Laden's training camps in Afghanistan, was one of the first high-level detainees captured after the Sept. 11 attacks. The full extent of the tactics used during his interrogation are still not publicly known, but the methods provoked the concerns within the C.I.A. about possible violation of the federal torture law. That law makes it a crime for an American operating overseas under governmental authority to torture anyone under his control. The tactics also raised concerns at the F.B.I., where some agents knew of the techniques being used on Mr. Zubaydah.


It is known that some Qaeda leaders were deprived of sleep and food and were threatened with beatings. In one instance a gun was waved near a prisoner, and in another a noose was hung close to a detainee.


Mr. Mohammed was "waterboarded" — strapped to a board and immersed in water — a technique used to make the subject believe that he might be drowned, officials said.


In the end, administration officials considered Mr. Zubaydah's interrogation an example of the successful use of harsh interrogation techniques. Most notably, they said, he helped identify Mr. Mohammed as the principal architect of the September 2001 hijacking plot and was the source of information about Jose Padilla, who was arrested in May 2002 in what officials said was a nascent plot to develop a dirty bomb using radiological materials.


Since Mr. Zubaydah's capture, another dozen to two dozen high-level Qaeda operatives have been taken into custody in a classified C.I.A. interrogation program.


An article in Sunday's Washington Post reported that the C.I.A. had suspended the use of the extreme interrogation tactics at the agency's detention facilities around the world pending a review by Justice Department and other administration lawyers, although the decision does not apply to military prisons such as the one at Guantánamo Bay. A C.I.A. spokesman declined to comment on the report.


The Bybee memo, the officials said, was not intended to support the use of aggressive techniques on less important captives held at Guantánamo Bay, or on Iraqi captives held at Abu Ghraib and other prisons in Iraq. In addition, some of the officials said they wanted to explain the background of the memo because they hoped to dispel the impression that Mr. Bybee, now a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, was a rogue advocate of potentially unlawful torture tactics. Instead, they said, Mr. Bybee and other lawyers who helped prepare the memo were trying to explore the boundaries of what the law might allow in the context of high-level Qaeda detainees.


The officials said the memo followed a series of exchanges between the C.I.A. and the Justice Department over the legality of specific techniques used on detainees not long after the Bush administration had decided to keep them out of the American judicial system and treat them as unlawful combatants who would not be protected by the Geneva Conventions, which bar harsh treatment of prisoners of war.


At the time of the Sept. 11 attacks, the Bush administration did not have an established infrastructure or legal framework for handling terrorism detainees. But after the attacks, the administration decided that terrorism should be considered a national security issue rather than a law enforcement matter, and Mr. Bush turned to the C.I.A., rather than the F.B.I., to take the lead in the detention and questioning of captured Qaeda leaders.


Mr. Bybee's memo provided sweeping legal authority for a wide range of interrogation techniques to be used on Qaeda operatives. To be regarded as torture, the memo said, mental pain must also be caused by "threats of imminent death; threats of infliction of the kind of pain that would amount to physical torture; infliction of such physical pain as a means of psychological torture; use of drugs or other procedures designed to deeply disrupt the senses, or fundamentally alter an individual's personality; or threatening to do any of these things to a third party." The memo added that the use of drugs under certain circumstances during interrogations would be permitted, as long as their effects fell short of what it described as legally prohibited: the "profound disruption of the senses or personality." The memo then explained at length that the definition of the word "profound" allowed for a broad interpretation of what measures were acceptable short of that.


"By requiring that the procedures and the drugs create a profound disruption, the statute requires more than that the acts forcibly separate or rend the sense or personality," it said. "Those acts must penetrate to the core of an individual's ability to perceive the world around him, substantially interfering with his cognitive abilities, or fundamentally alter his personality."

Juin 27, 2004


Les aides disent la coercition soutenue par note pour des cas de Qaeda
Par DAVID JOHNSTON et JAMES LEVÉ

ASHINGTON, juin 26 -- une note d'août 2002 par le département de justice qui a conclu des interrogateurs pourrait employer des techniques extrêmes sur des détenus dans la guerre sur la terreur aidée pour fournir une base juridique d'après-$$$-fait pour des procédures dures employées par la C.i.a. sur les chefs à niveau élevé d'Al Qaeda, selon les fonctionnaires de gouvernement courants et anciens.


La note légale a été préparée après qu'une discussion interne dans le gouvernement au sujet des méthodes extraire l'information à partir d'Abu Zubaydah, un d'aides supérieurs chargés de casier d'Osama, après sa capture en avril 2002, des fonctionnaires dits. La note a fourni une base légale pour des techniques coercive utilisées plus tard contre d'autres détenus de haut-rang, comme Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, pensé pour être l'architecte en chef des attaques septembre de 11, 2001, qui a été capturé début 2003.


L'à texte intégral de la note a été fait à public par Maison Blanche mardi sans explication environ pourquoi on lui a écrit ou si ses normes ont été appliquées. Jusqu'ici, il n'a pas été clair que la note ait été écrite en réponse aux efforts de la C.i.a d'extraire l'information à partir des suspects de Qaeda de haut-rang, et était indépendante des questions au sujet de manipuler des détenus au compartiment de Guantánamo ou en Irak.


La note a suggéré que le président pourrait autoriser une grande sélection de méthodes coercive d'interrogation dans la campagne contre le terrorisme sans traités internationaux de violation ou loi fédérale de torture. Elle n'a indiqué aucune procédure particulière mais suggéré il y avait peu de limites sous peu de causer la mort d'un prisonnier. Les méthodes employées sur M. Zubaydah et toute autre polémique remuée par employés de Qaeda d'aîné dans les cercles de counterterrorism de gouvernement et l'excédent de souci si des employés de la C.i.a pourraient être jugés responsables de violer la loi fédérale de torture.


Tandis que la note semblait donner à la C.i.a la latitude large en adoptant la tactique pour interroger les détenus à niveau élevé de Qaeda, elle est encore peu claire exactement quelles procédures ont été employées ou le point auquel la note a influencé la combinaison du gouvernement pensant aux interrogations d'autres détenus de terreur a capturé en Afghanistan et ailleurs.


Les fonctionnaires ont déclaré que la note a illustré que l'administration de buisson, en mois après les attaques de septembre 2001, recherchait instamment des manières de forcer les détenus aînés de Qaeda à révéler s'ils ont su de n'importe quelles futures attaques de terroriste prévues contre les Etats-Unis.


La note, qui est datée août 1, 2002, était un document juridique séminal guidant le gouvernement pensant sur l'interrogation. Elle a été désavouée plus tôt cette semaine par les conseillers juridiques aînés à l'administration de buisson qui a indiqué que la note serait passée en revue et mise à jour parce qu'elle a créé une impression fausse qui la torture pourrait être légalement défendable.


En niant la note dans les briefings cette semaine, aucune des conseillers juridiques de buisson aîné que Maison Blanche a rendus disponibles aux journalistes discuterait qui avait demandé que la note soit préparée, pourquoi il avaient été préparés ou comment il a été appliqué. Vendredi, le département de justice et la C.i.a ne discuteraient pas les origines de la note, mais dans les fonctionnaires passés à ces agences ont dit que les techniques d'interrogation utilisées sur des détenus étaient légales et n'ont pas violé le statut de torture, qui interdit généralement d'infliger la douleur grave et prolongée.


La note a été adressée à Alberto R. Gonzales, l'avocat-conseil Maison Blanche, et signée par Jay S. Bybee, puis le chef du bureau du département de justice des avocats-conseils légaux. Elle a indiqué que le document était un effort de définir des "normes de conduite" en vertu des traités internationaux et de la loi fédérale. La note a conclu qu'un procédé coercive ne pourrait pas être considéré torture à moins qu'il ait causé la douleur équivalente à cela accompagnant "des dommages physiques sérieux, tels que l'échec d'organe, l'affaiblissement de la fonction corporelle ou même la mort."


Le département de justice a été invité pour préparer la note au sujet de la période de la capture de M. Zubaydah's en avril 2002, les fonctionnaires dits, dans un effort de clarifier les limites permises de l'interrogation en raison des questions soulevées par le traitement de M. Zubaydah et quelques autres employés de Qaeda puis dans la garde. Il reste peu clair quel Général John Ashcroft de mandataire de rôle a joué au cours de la discussion au-dessus des techniques d'interrogation ou dans la préparation de la note, mais les fonctionnaires de département de justice ont déclaré qu'il ne l'a pas passée en revue avant qu'elle ait été envoyée à Maison Blanche.


M. Zubaydah, qui a contrôlé le système recruteur mondial de Qaeda d'Al pour M. camps de formation chargés de casier en Afghanistan, était un des premiers détenus à niveau élevé capturés après que septembre 11 attaque. La pleine ampleur de la tactique utilisée pendant son interrogation toujours publiquement ne sont pas connues, mais les méthodes ont provoqué les soucis dans la C.i.a concernant la violation possible de la loi fédérale de torture. Cette loi lui fait un crime pour un Américain fonctionnant outre-mer sous l'autorité gouvernementale à la torture n'importe qui sous sa commande. La tactique a également soulevé des inquiétudes au F.b.i., où quelques agents ont su des techniques étant employées sur M. Zubaydah.


On le sait que quelques chefs de Qaeda ont été privés du sommeil et de la nourriture et ont été menacés par des battements. Dans un exemple un pistolet a été ondulé près d'un prisonnier, et dans des autres un noose a été accroché près d'un détenu.


M. Mohammed était "waterboarded" -- attaché à un conseil et immergé dans l'eau -- une technique employée pour inciter le sujet à croire qu'il pourrait être noyé, des fonctionnaires a dit.


En fin de compte, les fonctionnaires d'administration ont considéré l'interrogation de M. Zubaydah's un exemple de l'utilisation réussie des techniques dures d'interrogation. Le plus notamment, ils ont dit, il a aidé à identifier M. Mohammed en tant qu'architecte principal de la parcelle de terrain de détournement de septembre 2001 et était la source d'informations sur Jose Padilla, qui a été arrêté en mai 2002 dans quels fonctionnaires dits était une parcelle de terrain naissante de développer une bombe sale en utilisant les matériaux radiologiques.


Puisque la capture de M. Zubaydah's, encore douzaine à deux employés à niveau élevé de douzaine Qaeda ont été prises dans la garde dans un programme classifié d'interrogation de la C.i.a.


Un article dans le poteau de Washington de dimanche a signalé que la C.i.a avait suspendu l'utilisation de la tactique extrême d'interrogation aux équipements de la détention de l'agence autour du monde en attendant une revue par Justice Department et d'autres avocats d'administration, bien que la décision ne s'applique pas aux prisons militaires telles que celle au compartiment de Guantánamo. Un porte-parole de la C.i.a a refusé de présenter ses observations sur le rapport.


La note de Bybee, les fonctionnaires dits, n'a pas été prévue pour soutenir l'utilisation des techniques agressives sur les captifs moins importants tenus au compartiment de Guantánamo, ou sur les captifs irakiens tenus chez Abu Ghraib et d'autres prisons en Irak. En outre, certains des fonctionnaires ont dit qu'ils ont voulu expliquer le fond de la note parce qu'ils ont espéré dissiper l'impression que M. Bybee, maintenant un juge sur la cour des Etats-Unis des lancer un appel pour le neuvième circuit, était un avocat de rogue de la tactique potentiellement illégale de torture. Au lieu de cela, ils ont dit, M. Bybee et d'autres avocats qui ont aidé à préparer la note essayaient d'explorer les frontières de ce que la loi pourrait admettre dans le contexte des détenus à niveau élevé de Qaeda.


Les fonctionnaires ont déclaré que la note a suivi une série d'échanges entre la C.i.a et le département de justice au-dessus de la légalité des techniques spécifiques utilisées sur des détenus pas longtemps après que l'administration de buisson ait décidé de les garder hors du système juridique américain et de les traiter en tant que combattants illégaux qui ne seraient pas protégés par les conventions de Genève, qui barrent le traitement dur des prisonniers de guerre.


À l'heure des attaques septembre de 11, l'administration de buisson n'a pas eu une infrastructure établie ou un cadre juridique pour manipuler des détenus de terrorisme. Mais après que les attaques, l'administration aient décidé que le terrorisme devrait être considéré une question concernant la sécurité national plutôt qu'une question d'application de loi, et M. Bush s'est tourné vers la C.i.a, plutôt que le F.b.i., pour prendre la tête dans la détention et l'interrogation des chefs capturés de Qaeda.


La note de M. Bybee's a fourni l'autorité légale rapide pour un éventail de techniques d'interrogation à employer sur des employés de Qaeda. Être considéré comme torture, la note dite, douleur mentale doit également être provoquée par des "menaces de la mort imminente; menaces de l'infliction du genre de douleur qui s'élèverait à la torture physique; infliction de tant de douleur physique comme moyens de torture psychologique; utilisation des drogues ou d'autres procédures conçues pour perturber profondément les sens, ou pour changer fondamentalement la personnalité d'un individu; ou menaçant de faire quelles de ces choses à un tiers." La note a ajouté que l'utilisation des drogues dans certaines circonstances pendant les interrogations serait autorisée, aussi longtemps que leurs effets ont fait défaut à ce qu'il a décrit comme légalement interdit: "la rupture profonde des sens ou de la personnalité." La note alors a expliqué longuement que la définition du mot "profond" a tenu compte d'une large interprétation de quelles mesures étaient short acceptable de cela.


"en exigeant que les procédures et les drogues créent une rupture profonde, le statut exige plus que cela les actes de force séparés ou rend le sens ou la personnalité," il a indiqué. "ces actes doivent pénétrer au noyau de la capacité d'un individu de percevoir le monde autour de lui, sensiblement interférant ses capacités cognitives, ou changez fondamentalement sa personnalité."

Copyright 2004 New York Times Company | À la maison | Politique D'Intimité | Recherche | Corrections | Aide | De nouveau au dessus

Posted by gh at 10:28 AM | Comments (55)

History of Lower Manhattan(where I live)

The New York Times > New York Region > The City >
Ground Zero: Before the Fall

Version traduite de la page http://nytimes.com/2004/06/27/nyregion/thecity/27feat.html?8hpib=

June 27, 2004


Ground Zero: Before the Fall
By ERIC LIPTON

ON a hilly spot, near the edge of the Hudson River shoreline, Jan Jansen Damen used a horse-drawn plow to turn up the sandy soil in the late 1630's as he carefully laid out a farm on the small chunk of the New World that he had been allotted by the Dutch West India Company.


Next Sunday, on that same patch of Lower Manhattan land, Gov. George E. Pataki and other dignitaries will gather for another groundbreaking: the start of the construction of the Freedom Tower, the centerpiece of the new World Trade Center.


The extraordinary calamity that unfolded on the site on Sept. 11, 2001, dominates the nearly four centuries of history separating these two groundbreakings. But the stories that stretch out in between, the stories of the men and women who occupied that land and of the way it has been worked and reworked again and again, are in many ways as big as New York itself.


From early on, this land has been associated with bloodshed: Damen, for example, its first European owner, played a critical role in a decision by the early Dutch colonists to massacre Indians living at two nearby settlements, igniting two years of warfare.


It is history that has also been marred before by ravenous fires, like an inferno in 1776 that destroyed every one of the dozens of homes on the site.


The land has also been a place of momentous celebrations, like the one in 1807, when Robert Fulton launched the world's first commercial steamship ferry from the foot of Cortlandt Street, revolutionizing the way people and goods traveled across the region and even around the globe.


Perhaps most important, it is on the same 16 acres where two towering temples to capitalism would one day be built that New York made its sometimes painful transition from a tiny colonial trading post to the most important metropolis in the world. By the 1850's, the once-rural spot had become an emporium of commerce, manufacturing and global transportation - in other words, a true world trade center. Countless other events, many of modest significance, and others of lasting historical import, unfolded here - including Civil War draft riots in 1863 and the inauguration of long-distance telephone service between New York and Chicago in 1892.


Taken from this perspective, what will take place next Sunday, while certainly a milestone for the site, is more like the turning of a page in an already extremely long book, one far older than the nation.


1643: Pioneers and Bloodshed


Jan Jansen Damen, who came from Holland around 1630 to help set up the new colony, was more than just a simple farmer. The first European owner of what would later become part of the World Trade Center site had much greater ambitions.


Like an early Donald Trump, Damen had a thirst for land and wealth. He pushed aggressively to secure commitments from the Dutch West India Company for grants or leases of property located just north of the barricade that was Wall Street. Below this barrier was all of settled New York, the land where the pioneers had built their crude, wooden-roofed homes.


When trouble came in the form of Indian attacks on settlers, the Dutch governor turned to Damen for advice, naming him in 1641 to New York's first local governing board, known as the Twelve Men.


The board's chairman, David Pietersen De Vries, urged Gov. Willem Kieft to be patient, as the tiny colony, with little in the form of arms or soldiers, was vulnerable and "the Indians, though cunning enough, would do no harm unless harm were done to them."


Damen did not agree. His land, at the edge of the settled area, was particularly vulnerable. In February 1643, accounts written at the time say, Damen and two other members of the Twelve Men entertained the governor with conversation and wine and reminded him that the Indians had not complied with his demands to make reparations for recent attacks. "God having now delivered the enemy evidently into our hands, we beseech you to permit us to attack them," they wrote in Dutch, in a document that survives today.


DeVries tried to calm Governor Kieft: "You go to break the Indians' heads; it is our nation you are about to destroy." But the governor disagreed. It was time, he resolved, "to make the savages wipe their chops."


The assault, which took place about midnight on Feb. 25, 1643, in Jersey City, then called Pavonia, and at Corlears Hook, now part of the Lower East Side, was an extraordinarily gruesome affair. "Infants were torn from their mothers' breasts and hacked to pieces," DeVries relates in his journal. Others "came running to us from the country, having their hands cut off; some lost both arms and legs; some were supporting their entrails with their hands, while others were mangled in other horrid ways too horrid to be conceived." In all, more than 100 were killed.


The region's Indian tribes united against Governor Kieft and the colonists. Damen was nicknamed "the church warden with blood on his hands," and expelled from the local governing board. The governor was ultimately recalled by the Dutch. The colony, over two years of retaliatory attacks, sank to a desperate state.


"Almost every place is abandoned," a group of colonists wrote to authorities in Holland in late 1643. "We, wretched people, must skulk, with wives and children that still survive, in poverty together, in and around the fort at the Manahatas, where we are not safe even for an hour whilst the Indians daily threaten to overwhelm us."


Damen died about 1650. His heirs sold his property to two men: Oloff Stevensen Van Cortlandt, a brewer and one-time soldier in the Dutch West India militia, and Dirck Dey, a farmer and cattle brander. Their names were ultimately assigned to the streets at the trade center site. Damen's was lost to history.


1776: From Fire, a Wasteland


More than a century had passed since the war with the Indians. But as the wind blew hard one night in 1776, moving northwest across Lower Manhattan, another disaster was about to unfold.


The Dutch had long since lost control of New York and the site of the future trade center had taken a much more modern shape. The windmill that a Dutchman named Pieter Mesier had built there in 1682 still stood. But Church Street had been laid out prior to 1695, followed by Cortlandt Street in 1733 and Vesey Street, named after William Vesey, the first rector at Trinity Church, in 1761. On the southern end of the site, reflecting New York's status as a British colony, was Crown Street - which was renamed Liberty Street in 1794.


Rows of small houses occupied by craftsmen and laborers had been built along these muddy, tree-lined streets. A sailboat ferry that departed from the foot of Cortlandt Street connected New York to Paulus Hook, New Jersey, where a two-day stagecoach could be taken to Philadelphia. The marshy land at the edge of Damen's old farm had been filled in, widening the island nearly to Washington Street.


On the windy night of Sept. 21, 1776, all this sense of order was destroyed.


Events started about 1 a.m. on the eastern side of Broadway, near Whitehall Slip. How the fire started was debated for years. Many blamed British soldiers who had occupied the city at the start of the Revolutionary War. Other suggested it was rebels, including Nathan Hale, who was executed for being a spy after being questioned about the fire.


In any case, the consequences were clear. The gusts fanned a small blaze and carried it north and west, toward the trade center site. As the fire crossed Broadway, Trinity Church fell to the flames.


The fire pushed across the houses lining Cortlandt, Dey and Vesey Streets. "Several women and children perished in the fire, their shrieks, joined to the roaring of the flames, the crash of falling houses and the widespread ruin which everywhere appeared, formed a scene of horror grand beyond description, and which was still heightened by the darkness of night," read an account published in The New York Mercury.


The fire was not brought under control until nearly 11 a.m. the next day. From 500 to 1,000 homes, one quarter of the settled city, were ruined.


Reconstruction came, as it had before, but this time, it was not immediate. The site lay untouched for many years, and soon became known as the Burnt District.


1807: Full Steam Ahead


Smoke again rose from the site one September morning in 1807, emanating from what onlookers described as some kind of a sea monster, hissing angrily and splashing about at the Cortlandt Street dock. But this smoke was a plume of progress.


There stood Robert Fulton, aboard the crazy invention that he promised would carry a ship full of passengers on an express trip up the Hudson River to Albany. The Clermont, as Fulton's craft would come to be called, was burning up pine knots as fuel and using the steam to turn a turbine that would paddle the vessel. But as skeptical passengers waited for the cruise to begin, Fulton, who had tried and failed before as an inventor with early models for a submarine and a torpedo, started to sweat. Black smoke poured from the chimney and the engine hissed. The boat lurched forward and stopped.


The chatter among the crowd was that the stunt would be a failure. But Fulton, standing proudly on the deck with eyes flashing, dismissed the naysayers. "Gentlemen, you need not be uneasy; you shall be in Albany before twelve o'clock tomorrow."


After a desperate adjustment of the machinery, the paddles started to turn. In that instant, the world shrank.


Fulton was not the first to build a steamship, but the first to turn a working steamship into a commercial venture. Though the steamboat did not fully replace the commercial sailboat for nearly a century, there at the trade center site, a fundamental shift in civilization had occurred.


Regular steamship service had now been established between the Cortlandt Street pier and Albany. Soon after, a string of other ferry services starting running to a variety of destinations. Piers were built all along the West Side, as steamships could more easily maneuver in the Hudson's open waters. By the middle of the 19th century, the site had become not just the launching point for short regional trips but also the embarkment spot for the nation and the world.


1850's: An Emporium Rises


With tens of thousands of New Yorkers now traveling each year to the Hudson River waterfront, the homes built to replace the Burnt District were quickly being replaced themselves. Taller structures were rising, particularly during 1851, when traffic jams on Cortlandt and Dey grew so intense the city decided to widen the streets.


The new structures were only three or four stories tall. But on the once-sleepy riverside streets emerged an emporium unlike any the world had seen. For the steam engine was not just powering ferries: factories were now using machines to mass-produce goods. The Industrial Revolution had arrived, right at a spot that would one day be called ground zero.


Bigelow Company sold boilers at 85 Liberty, Brill & Lenihan sold pencil cases at 91 Liberty, Otis G. Barnap sold railroad supplies at 93 Liberty and Nathan & Dreyfus sold brass goods at 108 Liberty, while John A. Roebling's Sons Company, the builder of the Brooklyn Bridge, sold wire at 117-121 Liberty. By 1860, an astounding one-third of all exports from the United States and more than two thirds of the imports passed through New York, much of it at the nearby Hudson River piers.


If Liberty Street was a manufacturing mecca, Cortlandt Street was a precursor to Herald Square. Merchants like Richards Kingsland sold looking glasses, Ferdinand Thieriot sold pocket watches, Rea & Pollock sold stoves and S. H. Wakeman offered perfume. Squeezed in between were the barber shops and boarding houses, including one of the city's biggest and most renowned, the Old Merchant's Hotel, at 41 Cortlandt.


Others who set up shop included doctors like Dr. Ralph, at 38 Cortlandt Street, who specialized in cures to "certain delicate diseases," like syphilis and gonorrhea, and Madame Restell, at 148 Greenwich Street, who became the nation's most famous abortionist. Part of Church Street became notorious for its brothels.


But no single place at the site drew more traffic than the chaotic complex of buildings near the corner of Vesey and West Streets. The cluster had started in 1771 under the name Bear Market, with a handful of vendors, angry about being so far from the bustle of Broadway.


But by the mid-19th century, what was now known as Washington Market had morphed into not only the biggest market in the city, but the biggest wholesale produce market in the country. Some 886 different stands sold fish, meats, poultry, preserves, coffee, butter, eggs, fruit, nuts and countless other items. The spot was so popular that merchants erected shanties on the sidewalk and then into West Street, turning the city's most congested street into a narrow passageway.


Piles of oyster shells, rotting vegetables, putrid meat and fish, as well as tons of trash dumped from the ships and manure from horse-drawn carriages, produced an odor that in summer was unbearable. Blood and animal refuse, the byproduct of butchering, flowed into the sewers. "A plague spot demanding excision," the Metropolitan Board of Health declared in 1866, launching a campaign to clean up the market. This led to the opening of annexes on West Street further north, including the precursor to what is still called the meatpacking district.


Thanks to that burst of commerce, New Yorkers began to feel a certain bravado. The tiny Dutch colony had by 1870 hatched into a metropolis (comprising both New York and Brooklyn, still separate cities) of 1.3 million. Trinity Church, rebuilt twice since the 1776 fire, was still the city's tallest structure. But something called the office building was arriving on scene. Starting in 1890, when the New York World tower opened across Broadway from the trade center site, it was the first to grab the crown of "world's tallest, " which would be passed around the neighborhood. The course was now clear. New York was charging ahead, and its commercial towers, not its churches, would dominate the sky.


"We are not permitted to take a narrow view of its future greatness," said the New York Harbor Commission report of 1854. It seemed to the commission that New York's "commerce will be greater than that of any city in ancient or in modern times, that it must become the centre of trade and exchanges, the storehouse and metropolis of the commercial world."


The Port Authority in the 1960's used just such breathless statements when it proposed the World Trade Center. "A new era of commerce will dawn on old Mannahatta when the Trade Center rises," a Port Authority brochure said, adding, "the island and its people, however, are accustomed to new eras."


Eric Lipton, a reporter for The New York Times, is the author, with James Glanz, of "City in the Sky: The Rise and Fall of the World Trade Center.''

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company | Home | Privacy Policy | Search | Corrections | Help | Back to Top

Juin 27, 2004


La Terre Zéro: Avant l'automne
Par ERIC LIPTON

N une tache accidentée, près du bord du shoreline de fleuve de Hudson, janv. Jansen Damen a utilisé une charrue hippomobile pour indiquer le sol arénacé vers la fin de 1630's pendant qu'il présentait soigneusement une ferme sur le petit gros morceau du nouveau monde qu'il avait été réparti par Dutch West India Company.


Le dimanche prochain, sur cette même pièce rapportée de terre inférieure de Manhattan, E. Pataki de Gov. George et d'autres dignitaries recueilleront pour des autres groundbreaking: le début de la construction de la tour de liberté, la pièce maîtresse du nouveau centre commercial mondial.


La calamité extraordinaire qui a dévoilé sur l'emplacement sur septembre 11, 2001, domine les presque quatre siècles de l'histoire séparant ces deux groundbreakings. Mais les histoires qui s'étendent hors de dans l'intervalle, les histoires des hommes et les femmes qui ont occupé cette terre et de la manière cela a été fonctionné et retouché à plusieurs reprises, sont de beaucoup de manières aussi grandes que New York lui-même.


De dès l'abord, cette terre a été associée au carnage: Damen, par exemple, son premier propriétaire européen, a joué un rôle critique dans une décision par les premiers colons hollandais aux Indiens de massacre vivant à deux règlements voisins, mettant à feu deux ans de guerre.


C'est une histoire qui également a été troublée avant par les feux ravenous, comme un inferno en 1776 qui a détruit chaque un des douzaines de maisons sur l'emplacement.


La terre a également été un endroit des célébrations importantes, comme celle de 1807, quand Robert Fulton a lancé le premier bac commercial du navire à vapeur du monde du pied de la rue de Cortlandt, révolutionnant les personnes de manière et les marchandises ont voyagé à travers la région et même autour du globe.


Peut-être le plus important, il est sur les mêmes 16 acres où on construirait deux temples trés hauts au capitalisme un jour que New York a fait à sa transition parfois douloureuse à partir d'un comptoir commercial colonial minuscule à la métropole la plus importante au monde. Par le 1850's, la tache une fois-rurale était devenue un emporium de commerce, de fabrication et de transport global - en d'autres termes, un véritable centre commercial mondial. Innombrable d'autres événements, beaucoup d'importance modeste, et d'autres de l'importation historique durable, ont dévoilé ici - comprenant des émeutes d'ébauche de guerre civile en 1863 et l'inauguration du service téléphonique de fond entre New York et Chicago en 1892.


Pris de cette perspective, ce qui aura lieu le dimanche prochain, alors que certainement une étape importante pour l'emplacement, est plus comme la rotation d'une page dans un livre déjà extrêmement long, un bien plus ancien que la nation.


1643: Pionniers et carnage


Janv. Jansen Damen, qui est venu de Hollande autour de 1630 pour aider à installer la nouvelle colonie, était plus que juste un fermier simple. Le premier propriétaire européen de ce qui deviendrait plus tard une partie de l'emplacement de centre commercial mondial a eu des ambitions beaucoup plus grandes.


Comme un atout tôt de Donald, Damen a eu une soif pour la terre et la richesse. Il a poussé agressivement pour fixer des engagements de Dutch West India Company pour des concessions ou les baux de la propriété ont localisé le nord juste de la barricade qui était Wall Street. Au-dessous de cette barrière était tout le New York arrangé, la terre où les pionniers avaient construit leur brut, maisons en bois-couvertes.


Quand l'ennui est venu sous forme d'attaques indiennes sur des colons, le gouverneur hollandais s'est tourné vers Damen pour le conseil, l'appelant en 1641 au premier conseil de direction local de New York, connu sous le nom de douze hommes.


Le Président du conseil, David Pietersen De Vries, Gov. Willem Kieft recommandé à être patient, en tant que colonie minuscule, avec peu sous forme de bras ou de soldats, était vulnérable et "les Indiens, bien qu'assez l'adresse, ne fasse aucun mal à moins que le mal aient été faits à eux."


Damen n'a pas convenu. Sa terre, au bord du secteur arrangé, était particulièrement vulnérable. En février 1643, les comptes écrits alors indiquent, Damen et deux autres membres des douze hommes a amusé le gouverneur avec la conversation et le vin et l'a rappelé que les Indiens ne s'étaient pas conformés à ses demandes pour faire des réparations pour des attaques récentes. "Dieu ayant maintenant fourni l'ennemi évidemment dans nos mains, nous vous sollicitons pour nous permettre de les attaquer," elles avons écrit dans le Néerlandais, dans un document qui survit aujourd'hui.


DeVries essayé pour calmer le Gouverneur Kieft: "vous allez casser les têtes des Indiens; c'est notre nation que vous êtes sur le point pour détruire." Mais le gouverneur était en désaccord. Il était temps, il a résolu, "pour faire aux sauvages le chiffon leurs coups de hache."


L'assaut, qui a eu lieu au sujet du minuit fév. 25, 1643, dans la ville du Jersey, puis a appelé Pavonia, et au crochet de Corlears, partie maintenant du côté est inférieur, était une affaire extraordinairement horrible. des "enfants en bas âge ont été déchirés des seins de leurs mères et entaillé aux morceaux," DeVries se relie en son journal. D'autres "sont venus courant à nous du pays, faisant découper leurs mains; certains ont perdu des bras et des jambes; certains soutenaient leurs entrailles avec leurs mains, alors que d'autres étaient mangled d'autres manières horribles trop horribles pour être conçu." En tout, plus de 100 ont été tués.


Les tribus indiennes de la région ont uni contre le Gouverneur Kieft et les colons. Damen a été surnommé "le surveillant d'église avec le sang sur ses mains," et expulsé du conseil de direction local. Le gouverneur a été finalement rappelé par le Néerlandais. La colonie, sur deux ans d'attaques de représailles, est descendue à un état désespéré.


"presque chaque endroit est abandonné," un groupe de colons a écrit aux autorités en Hollande vers la fin de 1643. "nous, les personnes misérables, devons skulk, avec des épouses et des enfants qui survivent toujours, dans la pauvreté ensemble, dans et autour du fort chez le Manahatas, où nous ne sommes pas sûrs même pendant une heure tandis que le journal d'Indiens menacent de nous accabler."


Damen mort environ 1650. Ses héritiers ont vendu sa propriété à deux hommes: Oloff Stevensen Van Cortlandt, un brasseur et un soldat jetable dans la milice occidentale hollandaise de l'Inde, et Dirck Dey, un fermier et brander de bétail. Leurs noms ont été finalement assignés aux rues à l'emplacement central commercial. Damen a été perdu à l'histoire.


1776: Du feu, une terre en friche


Plus qu'un siècle avaient passé depuis la guerre avec les Indiens. Mais car le vent a soufflé dur une nuit en 1776, le nord-ouest mobile à travers Manhattan inférieure, un autre désastre était sur le point de dévoiler.


Le Néerlandais depuis longtemps avait perdu la commande de New York et l'emplacement du centre du commerce de futur avait pris une forme beaucoup plus moderne. Le moulin à vent qu'un Néerlandais a appelé Pieter Mesier avait construit là dans 1682 immobiles tenus. Mais la rue d'église avait été présentée avant 1695, suivi de Cortlandt Street en 1733 et rue de Vesey, baptisée du nom de William Vesey, le premier recteur à l'église de trinité, en 1761. Sur l'extrémité méridionale de l'emplacement, le statut de New York se reflétant en tant que colonie britannique, était la rue de couronne - qui a été retitrée rue de liberté en 1794.


Des rangées de petites maisons occupées par des artisans et des travailleurs avaient été établies le long de ces rues boueuses et arbre-rayées. Un bac de bateau à voiles qui s'est écarté du pied de la rue de Cortlandt a relié New York au crochet de Paulus, New Jersey, où une diligence de deux jours pourrait être prise à Philadelphie. La terre marshy au bord de la vieille ferme de Damen avait été complétée, presque élargissant l'île à la rue de Washington.


La nuit venteuse septembre de 21, 1776, tout ce sens d'ordre a été détruit.


Les événements ont commencé environ 1 heure du matin du côté oriental de Broadway, près de la glissade de Whitehall. Comment le feu commencé a été discuté pendant des années. Beaucoup ont blâmé les soldats britanniques qui avaient occupé la ville au début du révolutionnaire que War. Other a suggéré que c'ait été des rebelles, y compris Nathan vigoureux, qui a été exécuté pour être un espion après avoir été interrogé au sujet du feu.


De toute façon, les conséquences étaient claires. Les rafales ont éventé une petite flamme et l'ont portée nord et ouest, vers l'emplacement central commercial. Comme feu Broadway croisé, église de trinité est tombé aux flammes.


Le feu a poussé à travers les maisons rayant des rues de Cortlandt, de Dey et de Vesey. les "plusieurs femmes et enfants ont péri dans le feu, leurs cris perçants, jointifs à hurler des flammes, l'accident des maisons en chute et la ruine répandue qui est apparues partout, formée une scène d'horreur grande au delà de la description, et qui était encore intensifiée par l'obscurité de la nuit," lisez un compte édité dans le mercure de New York.


Le feu n'a pas été maîtrisé jusqu'à presque 11 heures du matin le jour suivant. De 500 à 1.000 maisons, un quart de la ville arrangée, ont été ruinées.


La reconstruction est venue, comme elle a eu avant, mais cette fois, elle n'était pas immédiate. L'emplacement étendu intact pendant beaucoup d'années, et est bientôt devenu notoire comme zone brûlée.


1807: Pleine Vapeur En avant


La fumée s'est encore levée de l'emplacement un matin de septembre en 1807, émanant de quels spectateurs ont décrit en tant que certain genre de monstre de mer, sifflant en colère et éclaboussant environ au dock de rue de Cortlandt. Mais cette fumée était un plume de progrès.


Robert là tenu Fulton, à bord de l'invention folle qu'il a promise porterait un bateau complètement des passagers en voyage exprès vers le haut du fleuve de Hudson à Albany. Le Clermont, comme métier de Fulton viendrait pour s'appeler, brûlait vers le haut des noeuds de pin comme carburant et employait la vapeur pour tourner une turbine qui barboterait le navire. Mais car les passagers sceptiques ont attendu la croisière pour commencer, Fulton, qui avait essayé et avait échoué avant en tant qu'inventeur avec les modèles tôt pour un sous-marin et une torpille, a commencé à suer. La fumée noire s'est renversée de la cheminée et le moteur a sifflé. Le bateau a vacillé en avant et s'est arrêté.


Le broutement parmi la foule était que l'arrêt serait un échec. Mais Fulton, se tenant fièrement sur la plate-forme avec des yeux clignotant, a écarté les naysayers. des "messieurs, vous n'avez pas besoin d'être incommode; vous serez à Albany avant douze heures demain."


Après un ajustement désespéré des machines, les palettes ont démarré pour tourner. Dans celui instantané, le monde s'est rétréci.


Fulton n'était pas le premier pour construire un navire à vapeur, mais le premier pour transformer un navire à vapeur fonctionnant en entreprise commerciale. Bien que le steamboat n'ait pas entièrement remplacé le bateau à voiles commercial pour presque un siècle, là à l'emplacement central commercial, une variation fondamentale dans la civilisation s'était produite.


Le service régulier de navire à vapeur avait été maintenant établi entre le pilier de rue de Cortlandt et Albany. Peu après, une corde d'autres services de bac commençant courir à une variété de destinations. Des piliers ont été construits tous le long du côté occidental, car les navires à vapeur pourraient plus facilement manoeuvrer dans les eaux ouvertes du Hudson. Par le milieu du 19ème siècle, l'emplacement était devenu pas simplement le point de lancement pour les voyages régionaux courts mais également la tache d'embarkment pour la nation et le monde.


1850's: Un Emporium Se lève


Par des dizaines de milliers de nouveau Yorkers voyageant maintenant tous les ans au bord de mer de fleuve de Hudson, les maisons établies pour remplacer la zone brûlée rapidement étaient remplacées. Des structures plus grandes montaient, en particulier pendant 1851, quand les embouteillages sur Cortlandt et Dey se sont développés si intense la ville décidée pour élargir les rues.


The new structures were only three or four stories tall. But on the once-sleepy riverside streets emerged an emporium unlike any the world had seen. For the steam engine was not just powering ferries: factories were now using machines to mass-produce goods. The Industrial Revolution had arrived, right at a spot that would one day be called ground zero.


Bigelow Company sold boilers at 85 Liberty, Brill & Lenihan sold pencil cases at 91 Liberty, Otis G. Barnap sold railroad supplies at 93 Liberty and Nathan & Dreyfus sold brass goods at 108 Liberty, while John A. Roebling's Sons Company, the builder of the Brooklyn Bridge, sold wire at 117-121 Liberty. By 1860, an astounding one-third of all exports from the United States and more than two thirds of the imports passed through New York, much of it at the nearby Hudson River piers.


If Liberty Street was a manufacturing mecca, Cortlandt Street was a precursor to Herald Square. Merchants like Richards Kingsland sold looking glasses, Ferdinand Thieriot sold pocket watches, Rea & Pollock sold stoves and S. H. Wakeman offered perfume. Squeezed in between were the barber shops and boarding houses, including one of the city's biggest and most renowned, the Old Merchant's Hotel, at 41 Cortlandt.


Others who set up shop included doctors like Dr. Ralph, at 38 Cortlandt Street, who specialized in cures to "certain delicate diseases," like syphilis and gonorrhea, and Madame Restell, at 148 Greenwich Street, who became the nation's most famous abortionist. Part of Church Street became notorious for its brothels.


But no single place at the site drew more traffic than the chaotic complex of buildings near the corner of Vesey and West Streets. The cluster had started in 1771 under the name Bear Market, with a handful of vendors, angry about being so far from the bustle of Broadway.


But by the mid-19th century, what was now known as Washington Market had morphed into not only the biggest market in the city, but the biggest wholesale produce market in the country. Some 886 different stands sold fish, meats, poultry, preserves, coffee, butter, eggs, fruit, nuts and countless other items. The spot was so popular that merchants erected shanties on the sidewalk and then into West Street, turning the city's most congested street into a narrow passageway.


Piles of oyster shells, rotting vegetables, putrid meat and fish, as well as tons of trash dumped from the ships and manure from horse-drawn carriages, produced an odor that in summer was unbearable. Blood and animal refuse, the byproduct of butchering, flowed into the sewers. "A plague spot demanding excision," the Metropolitan Board of Health declared in 1866, launching a campaign to clean up the market. This led to the opening of annexes on West Street further north, including the precursor to what is still called the meatpacking district.


Thanks to that burst of commerce, New Yorkers began to feel a certain bravado. The tiny Dutch colony had by 1870 hatched into a metropolis (comprising both New York and Brooklyn, still separate cities) of 1.3 million. Trinity Church, rebuilt twice since the 1776 fire, was still the city's tallest structure. But something called the office building was arriving on scene. Starting in 1890, when the New York World tower opened across Broadway from the trade center site, it was the first to grab the crown of "world's tallest, " which would be passed around the neighborhood. The course was now clear. New York was charging ahead, and its commercial towers, not its churches, would dominate the sky.


"We are not permitted to take a narrow view of its future greatness," said the New York Harbor Commission report of 1854. It seemed to the commission that New York's "commerce will be greater than that of any city in ancient or in modern times, that it must become the centre of trade and exchanges, the storehouse and metropolis of the commercial world."


The Port Authority in the 1960's used just such breathless statements when it proposed the World Trade Center. "A new era of commerce will dawn on old Mannahatta when the Trade Center rises," a Port Authority brochure said, adding, "the island and its people, however, are accustomed to new eras."


Eric Lipton, a reporter for The New York Times, is the author, with James Glanz, of "City in the Sky: The Rise and Fall of the World Trade Center.''

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company | Home | Privacy Policy | Search | Corrections | Help | Back to Top

Posted by gh at 10:09 AM | Comments (51)

June 24, 2004

Toxic Freedom, supplement and other

Kosovo depleted uranium:

Depleted uranium ammunitions in Kosovo, map 1.

Depleted uranium ammunitions in Kosovo, map 2.

Other radioactive things:

Radioactive Arctic

Tchernobyl footprint.

All maps from Le Monde Diplomatique [ http://www.monde-diplomatique.fr ]

Posted by renaud at 08:36 AM | Comments (43)

June 23, 2004

African World War

Rumblings of war in heart of Africa | csmonitor.com

Version traduite de la page http://
Rumblings of war in heart of Africa
US and UN send envoys to stop Congo conflict.

By Abraham McLaughlin and Duncan Woodside

JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA AND KIGALI, RWANDA - There's an eery familiarity to the military maneuvering in and around Congo, a giant nation in the heart of Africa.


Some observers worry that the region is slipping into a second African "world war" - a repeat of the 1998-2003 conflict that involved troops from six nations and left 3 million dead.

from the June 23, 2004 edition - http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/0623/p01s04-woaf.html

VERSION FRANCAIS LA BAS

Rumblings of war in heart of Africa
US and UN send envoys to stop Congo conflict.

By Abraham McLaughlin and Duncan Woodside

JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA AND KIGALI, RWANDA - There's an eery familiarity to the military maneuvering in and around Congo, a giant nation in the heart of Africa.


Some observers worry that the region is slipping into a second African "world war" - a repeat of the 1998-2003 conflict that involved troops from six nations and left 3 million dead.


Refugees are now streaming out of eastern Congo. Congolese troops are positioning near the border with longtime rival Rwanda, which is threatening retaliation. Congo's young president, Joseph Kabila, reshuffled his cabinet after an alleged coup attempt and has apparently discussed getting military help from Angola and Tanzania.


Yet there are also signs that this war could be more easily prevented than the last. For one thing, this time the players have more to lose. Rwanda, for instance, gets most of its budget from outside donors and risks losing the money if it goes to war. And outsiders like South Africa want access to Congo's gold, diamond, copper, and other resources - hard to extract amid conflict.


For sure, though, it's a high-stakes game. If by bringing in troops and improving ties with anti-Rwandan militias, Congo's leaders "are creating an ad hoc army" to take on Rwanda, "they could have a real problem on their hands," says Richard Cornwell of the Institute for Security Studies in Pretoria. Partly that's because "the Rwandans are the best in the business" of waging war in Africa.


Rwanda is tiny - smaller than the state of Massachusetts. Congo is more than three times the size of Texas. But Rwanda jump-started the 1996 rebellion that ousted Congo's (then Zaire's) longtime dictator Mobutu Sese Seko. It also helped spark the rebellion that started the first big war in 1998. That conflict's rate of killing - including deaths by starvation and illness - was the equivalent of one Sept. 11 every day and a half for five straight years. A peace deal brokered by South Africa in 2003 ended the conflict and set up a power-sharing plan that included Rwanda-backed rebels in a transitional government. Congo aims to have elections by 2005.


Indeed, "The whole story of the Congo [conflict] is about the relationship between Congo and Rwanda," says a regional analyst who asked not to be named.


In the saga's latest chapter, earlier this month, two renegade militias in Congo occupied the eastern city of Bukavu for a week. Congo accuses Rwanda of actively backing those militias. Congo responded by chasing the groups out of Bukavu and putting 5,000 to 10,000 troops near the Rwanda border.


Rwanda reacted forcefully. "We shall not sit back and watch these developments, as we have a country and people to defend," said Rwandan Foreign Minister Charles Muligande.


Besides the Rwanda tension, there was apparently a failed coup in Congo's capital, Kinshasa, on June 11. But it may not point to instability. Some figure Kabila orchestrated it to give himself an excuse to reshuffle the cabinet and consolidate power. In fact, some see the "coup" and the eastern troop deployment as pro-active efforts to assert more control over his notoriously ungovernable nation.


"We can't just assume that every time a gun goes off in Africa it's the start of another big war," says the regional analyst, asserting that Kabila's moves may be, at base, domestically motivated, rather than an effort to stir up trouble with Rwanda.


If so, Kabila will have to assert control over the wild eastern region and convince Rwanda that Congo will contain anti-Rwandan rebel fighters, which have been holed up in Congo since the 1994 genocide. Many of them were genocide perpetrators. Rwanda claims they still number about 20,000 and cites their presence as reason for continued involvement in Congo.


Anecdotally, there's evidence of growing Rwandan reinvolvement in the area. Since late last year, increasing numbers of families in Rwanda's capital, Kigali, have talked about being afraid for the safety of their sons, who they say have gone to Congo. In Bukavu, many renegade militia troops wore brand-new uniforms - hints of Rwandan support.


Eastern Congo is also rich in resources, which partly explains many states' involvement in the 1998 war. There's copper, diamonds, coltan - used in cellphones and laptop computers - and methane, among other things.


Methane is key for Rwanda, given its severe electricity shortage. Rwanda has gotten a flood of foreign financial aid, in part out of guilt over inaction during the genocide. It's also courting foreign investors hard. In all, its construction sector grew some 16 percent last year. Thus the growing demand for electricity and the desire to tap methane beneath Lake Kivu, which straddles the Rwanda-Congo border. To its critics, Rwanda's methane appetite helps explain the occupation by Rwanda-friendly militias of Bukavu, which sits on the banks of Lake Kivu.


Yet Rwanda would lose much amid an all-out war. Loss of international aid would severely strain its economy and deter outside private investment. A new war could see Rwanda losing remaining goodwill sparked by genocide-related guilt.


Outside powers also have lots at stake. Uganda was heavily involved in the 1998 war. It too risks losing big budgetary support from foreign donors. South Africa seeks to reap economic rewards of a stabilized continent. South African President Thabo Mbeki has warned of a real possibility of "catastrophic war."


The United Nations' most-expensive peacekeeping operation in the world is in Congo. "People want to see a return on that investment," says the regional analyst. Indeed, on Monday, a UN helicopter fired on one of the two renegade militias - the first such action by this UN team. Even the US has sent a top diplomat to promote peace. In 1998, the parties were "left to their own devices" by outside powers, says the analyst. Not this time.


But much depends on the moves of the two renegade groups that started the crisis. One, led by Col. Jules Mutebutsi, retreated Tuesday into Rwanda. The other, which has regrouped north of Bukavu, is led by Gen. Laurent Nkunda. In a phone interview, he says he'll react to the next moves by his allies in Kinshasa. "I will make my next move [when they take] a new position," he says. That means the unfolding drama in Congo's capital is key.

VERSION FRANCAIS

Rumblings de guerre au coeur de l'Afrique
Les USA et l'cOnu envoient des envoys au conflit du Congo d'arrêt.

Par Abraham McLaughlin et Duncan Woodside

JOHANNESBURG, l'cAfrique DU SUD ET KIGALI, RWANDA - il y a une connaissance eery à la manoeuvre militaire et autour à du Congo, une nation géante au coeur de l'Afrique.


Quelques observateurs inquiètent que la région glisse dans une deuxième "guerre mondiale" africaine - une répétition du conflit 1998-2003 qui a fait participer des troupes de six nations et à gauche de 3 millions morts.


Les réfugiés coulent maintenant hors du Congo oriental. Les troupes de Congolese placent près de la frontière avec le rival Rwanda de longtime, qui menace la revanche. Jeune président du Congo, Joseph Kabila, a remanié son coffret après qu'une tentative alléguée de coup et a apparemment discuté obtenir des militaires aident d'Angola et de Tanzanie.


Pourtant il y a également des signes que cette guerre pourrait plus facilement être empêchée que durent. Pour une chose, cette fois les joueurs prennent plus à perdre. Le Rwanda, par exemple, obtient la majeure partie de son budget des donateurs extérieurs et des risques perdant l'argent s'il va faire la guerre. Et les étrangers comme l'Afrique du Sud veulent l'accès à l'or du Congo, au diamant, au cuivre, et à d'autres ressources - dur pour extraire parmi le conflit.


Pour sûr, bien que, il soit haut-jalonne le jeu. Si en apportant les troupes et en améliorant des cravates avec les milices anti-Rwandaises, les chefs du Congo "créent une armée ade-hoc" pour prendre le Rwanda, "ils pourraient avoir un problème réel sur leurs mains," dit Richard Cornwell de l'institut pour des études de sécurité à Pretoria. En partie c'est parce que "le Rwandans sont le meilleur dans les affaires" de faire la guerre en Afrique.


Le Rwanda est minuscule - plus petit que l'état du Massachusetts. Le Congo est plus de trois fois la taille du Texas. Mais le Rwanda sauter-a commencé la rébellion 1996 qui a évincé dictateur Mobutu Sese Seko du longtime du Congo (puis Zaïre). Il a également aidé l'étincelle la rébellion qui a commencé la première grande guerre en 1998. Que le taux du conflit de massacre - comprenant les décès par famine et maladie - était l'équivalent un septembre de 11 chaque jour et une moitié pendant cinq années droites. Une affaire de paix brokered par l'Afrique du Sud dans 2003 a fini le conflit et a installé un plan departage qui a inclus les rebelles Rwanda-soutenus dans un gouvernement transitoire. Objectifs du Congo pour avoir des élections d'ici 2005.


En effet, "l'histoire entière du Congo [ conflit ] est au sujet du rapport entre le Congo et le Rwanda," dit un analyste régional qui a demandé à ne pas être appelé.


Dans le dernier chapitre des saga, plus tôt ce mois, deux milices de renegade au Congo ont occupé la ville orientale de Bukavu pendant une semaine. Le Congo accuse le Rwanda de soutenir activement ces milices. Le Congo a répondu en chassant les groupes hors de Bukavu et en mettant 5.000 à 10.000 troupes près de la frontière du Rwanda.


Le Rwanda réagi avec force. "nous ne nous assiérons pas en arrière et observer ces développements, car nous avons un pays et un peuple à défendre," a dit le ministre des affaires étrangères rwandais Charles Muligande.


Sans compter que la tension du Rwanda, il y avait apparemment un coup échoué dans la capitale du Congo, Kinshasa, juin 11. Mais il peut ne pas se diriger à l'instabilité. Une certaine figure Kabila l'a orchestré pour se donner une excuse pour remanier le coffret et pour consolider la puissance. En fait, certains voient le "coup" et l'déploiement oriental de troupe en tant qu'efforts pro-actifs d'affirmer plus de contrôle de sa nation notoirement ungovernable.


"nous ne pouvons pas simplement supposer que chaque fois qu'un pistolet entre au loin en Afrique c'est le début d'une autre grande guerre," dit l'analyste régional, affirmant que les mouvements de Kabila peuvent être, à la base, domestiquement motivée, plutôt qu'un effort de remuer vers le haut de l'ennui avec le Rwanda.


Si oui, Kabila devra affirmer le contrôle de la région orientale sauvage et convaincre le Rwanda que le Congo contiendra les combattants rebelles anti-Rwandais, qui ont été troués vers le haut au Congo depuis le genocide 1994. Bon nombre d'entre eux étaient des perpetrators de genocide. Le Rwanda les réclame numérotent environ 20.000 et citent toujours leur présence comme raison de participation continue au Congo.


Anecdotally, il y a d'évidence d'accroître le reinvolvement rwandais dans le secteur. Depuis tard l'année dernière, les nombres croissants de familles dans la capitale du Rwanda, Kigali, ont parlé d'avoir peur pour la sûreté de leurs fils, qu'ils indiquent sont allés au Congo. Dans Bukavu, beaucoup de troupes de milice de renegade ont porté les uniformes tous neufs - conseils d'appui rwandais.


Le Congo oriental est également des riches dans les ressources, qui explique en partie la participation de beaucoup d'états dans la guerre 1998. Il y a de cuivre, des diamants, de coltan - utilisé en cellphones et ordinateurs portables - et méthane, entre autres.


Le méthane est principal pour le Rwanda, donné son manque grave de l'électricité. Le Rwanda a obtenu une pléthore d'aide financière étrangère, en partie de l'inaction finie de culpabilité pendant le genocide. Il va au devant également des investisseurs étrangers dur. En tout, son secteur de construction a accru l'année dernière environ 16 pour cent. Ainsi la demande croissante en électricité et le désir de taper le méthane sous le lac Kivu, qui écarte les jambes la frontière du Rwanda-Congo. À ses critiques, les aides d'appétit du méthane du Rwanda expliquent le métier par les milices Rwanda-amicales de Bukavu, qui se repose sur les banques du lac Kivu.


Pourtant le Rwanda perdrait beaucoup parmi une guerre globale. La perte d'aide internationale tendrait sévèrement son économie et découragerait l'investissement privé extérieur. Une nouvelle guerre pourrait voir que bonne volonté restante perdante du Rwanda a étincelé par culpabilité genocide-connexe.


En dehors des puissances ayez également les sorts en jeu. L'Ouganda a été fortement impliqué dans la guerre 1998. Elle risque aussi le grand appui budgétaire perdant des donateurs étrangers. L'Afrique du Sud cherche à récolter les récompenses économiques d'un continent stabilisé. Le Président sud-africain Thabo Mbeki a averti d'une vraie possibilité "de guerre catastrophique."


L'opération peacekeeping plus-chère des nations unies dans le monde est au Congo. les "gens veulent voir un retour sur cet investissement," dit l'analyste régional. En effet, lundi, un hélicoptère de l'cOnu mis le feu sur un des deux milices de renegade - le premier une telle action par cette équipe de l'cOnu. Même les USA ont envoyé un diplomate supérieur pour favoriser la paix. En 1998, les parties étaient "à gauche à leurs propres dispositifs" par des puissances extérieures, dit l'analyste. Non cette fois.


Mais beaucoup dépend des mouvements des deux groupes de renegade qui ont commencé la crise. On, mené par Col. Jules Mutebutsi, a retraité mardi en le Rwanda. autre, qui avoir regrouper nord Bukavu, être mener par Générateur Laurent Nkunda. Dans une entrevue de téléphone, il dit qu'il réagira aux prochains mouvements par ses alliés dans Kinshasa. "je ferai à mon prochain mouvement [ quand ils prennent ] une nouvelle position," il dit. Cela signifie que le drame de déploiement dans la capitale du Congo est clef.


Toxic Freedom

Depleted uranium weapons are all over Iraq and Kosovo. What insanity. Even in the aftemath these weapons kill innocent people.

Remains of toxic bullets litter Iraq | csmonitor.com

Remains of toxic bullets litter Iraq
The Monitor finds high levels of radiation left by US armor-piercing shells.

By Scott Peterson | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor

BAGHDAD - At a roadside produce stand on the outskirts of Baghdad, business is brisk for Latifa Khalaf Hamid. Iraqi drivers pull up and snap up fresh bunches of parsley, mint leaves, dill, and onion stalks.


But Ms. Hamid's stand is just four paces away from a burnt-out Iraqi tank, destroyed by - and contaminated with - controversial American depleted-uranium (DU) bullets.

Restes de civière toxique Irak de balles
Le moniteur trouve les niveaux élevés du rayonnement gauches par les coquilles armor-piercing des USA.

Par Scott Peterson |Auteur de personnel du moniteur chrétien de la Science

BAGDAD - à un stand de produit de bord de la route sur les périphéries de Bagdad, les affaires sont vives pour Latifa Khalaf Hamid. Les conducteurs irakiens tirent vers le haut et se cassent vers le haut des groupes frais de persil, menthe part, aneth, et tiges d'oigno

from the May 15, 2003 edition - http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/0515/p01s02-woiq.html

Remains of toxic bullets litter Iraq
The Monitor finds high levels of radiation left by US armor-piercing shells.

By Scott Peterson | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor

BAGHDAD - At a roadside produce stand on the outskirts of Baghdad, business is brisk for Latifa Khalaf Hamid. Iraqi drivers pull up and snap up fresh bunches of parsley, mint leaves, dill, and onion stalks.


But Ms. Hamid's stand is just four paces away from a burnt-out Iraqi tank, destroyed by - and contaminated with - controversial American depleted-uranium (DU) bullets. Local children play "throughout the day" on the tank, Hamid says, and on another one across the road.


No one has warned the vendor in the faded, threadbare black gown to keep the toxic and radioactive dust off her produce. The children haven't been told not to play with the radioactive debris. They gather around as a Geiger counter carried by a visiting reporter starts singing when it nears a DU bullet fragment no bigger than a pencil eraser. It registers nearly 1,000 times normal background radiation levels on the digital readout.


The Monitor visited four sites in the city - including two randomly chosen destroyed Iraqi armored vehicles, a clutch of burned American ammunition trucks, and the downtown planning ministry - and found significant levels of radioactive contamination from the US battle for Baghdad.


In the first partial Pentagon disclosure of the amount of DU used in Iraq, a US Central Command spokesman told the Monitor that A-10 Warthog aircraft - the same planes that shot at the Iraqi planning ministry - fired 300,000 bullets. The normal combat mix for these 30-mm rounds is five DU bullets to 1 - a mix that would have left about 75 tons of DU in Iraq.


The Monitor saw only one site where US troops had put up handwritten warnings in Arabic for Iraqis to stay away. There, a 3-foot-long DU dart from a 120 mm tank shell, was found producing radiation at more than 1,300 times background levels. It made the instrument's staccato bursts turn into a steady whine.


"If you have pieces or even whole [DU] penetrators around, this is not an acute health hazard, but it is for sure above radiation protection dose levels," says Werner Burkart, the German deputy director general for Nuclear Sciences and Applications at the UN's International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. "The important thing in any battlefield - especially in populated urban areas - is somebody has to clean up these sites."
Minimizing the risk

Fresh-from-the-factory DU tank shells are normally handled with gloves, to minimize the health risk, and shielded with a thin coating. The alpha particle radiation emitted by DU travels less than an inch and can be stopped by cloth or even tissue paper. But when the DUmaterial burns (usually on impact; or as a dust, it can spontaneously ignite) protective shields disappear, and dangerous radioactive oxides are created that can be inhaled or ingested.


"[The risk] depends so very much on how you handle it," says Jan Olof Snihs, of Sweden's Radiation Protection Authority in Stockholm. In most cases dangers are low, he says, unless children eat toxic and radioactive soil, or get DU oxides on their hands.


Radioactive particles are a "special risk associated with a war," Mr. Snihs says. "The authorities should be aware of this, and try to decontaminate places like this, just to avoid unnecessary risk."


Pentagon officials say that DU is relatively harmless and a necessary part of modern warfare. They say that pre-Gulf War studies that indicated a risk of cancer and of causing harm to local populations through permanent contamination have been superseded by newer reports.


"There is not really any danger, at least that we know about, for the people of Iraq," said Lt. Col. Michael Sigmon, deputy surgeon for the US Army's V Corps, told journalists in Baghdad last week. He asserted that children playing with expended tank shells would have to eat and then practically suffocate on DU residue to cause harm.


But there is a growing chorus of concern among United Nations and relief officials, along with some Western scientific experts, who are calling for sites contaminated with DU be marked off and made safe.


"The soil around the impact sites of [DU] penetrators may be heavily contaminated, and could be harmful if swallowed by children," says Brian Spratt, chair of the working group on DU at The Royal Society, Britain's premier scientific institution.
Heavy metal toys?

Fragments and penetrators should be removed, since "children find them fascinating objects, and can pocket them," says Professor Spratt. "The science says there is some danger - not perhaps a huge danger - of these objects. ... We certainly do not say that these things are safe; we say that cleanup is important."


The British Ministry of Defense says it will offer screening to soldiers suspected of DU exposure, and will publish details about locations and quantities of DU that British troops used in Iraq - a tiny fraction of that fired by US forces.


The Pentagon has traditionally been tight-lipped about DU: Official figures on the amount used were not released for years after the 1991 Gulf War and Bosnia conflicts, and nearly a year after the 1999 Kosovo campaign. No US official contacted could provide DU use estimates from the latest war in Iraq.


"The first thing we should ask [the US military] is to remove that immediately," says Carel de Rooy, head of the UN Children's Fund in Baghdad, adding that senior UN officials need urgent advice on avoiding exposure.


The UN Environment Program last month called for field tests. DU "is still an issue of great concern for the general public," said UNEP chief Klaus Töpfer. "An early study in Iraq could either lay these fears to rest or confirm that there are indeed potential risks."
US troops avoid wreckage

During the latest Iraq conflict Abrams tanks, Bradley fighting vehicles and A-10 Warthog aircraft, among other military platforms, all fired the DU bullets from desert war zones to the heart of Baghdad. No other armor-piercing round is as effective against enemy tanks. While the Pentagon says there's no risk to Baghdad residents, US soldiers are taking their own precautions in Iraq, and in some cases have handed out warning leaflets and put up signs.


"After we shoot something with DU, we're not supposed to go around it, due to the fact that it could cause cancer," says a sergeant in Baghdad from New York, assigned to a Bradley, who asked not to be further identified.


"We don't know the effects of what it could do," says the sergeant. "If one of our vehicles burnt with a DU round inside, or an ammo truck, we wouldn't go near it, even if it had important documents inside. We play it safe."


Six American vehicles struck with DU "friendly fire" in 1991 were deemed to be too contaminated to take home, and were buried in Saudi Arabia. Of 16 more brought back to a purpose-built facility in South Carolina, six had to be buried in a low-level radioactive waste dump.


Television footage of the war last month showed Iraqi armored vehicles burning as US columns drove by, a common sign of a strike by DU, which burns through armor on impact, and often ignites the ammunition carried by the targeted vehicle.


"We were buttoned up when we drove by that - all our hatches were closed," the US sergeant says. "If we saw anything on fire, we wouldn't stop anywhere near it. We would just keep on driving."


That's an option that produce seller Hamid doesn't have.


She says the US broke its promise not to bomb civilians. She has found US cluster bomblets in her garden; the DU is just another dangerous burden, in a war about which she remains skeptical.


"We were told it was going to be paradise [when Saddam Hussein was toppled], and now they are killing our children," she says voicing a common Iraqi perception about the risk of DU. "The Americans did not bother to warn us that this is a contaminated area."


There is a warning now at the Doura intersection on the southern outskirts of Baghdad. In the days before the capital fell, four US supply trucks clustered near an array of highway off-ramps caught fire, cooking off a number of DU tank rounds.


American troops wearing facemasks for protection arrived a few days later and bulldozed the topsoil around the site to limit the contamination.


The troops taped handwritten warning signs in Arabic to the burned vehicles, which read: "Danger - Get away from this area." These were the only warnings seen by this reporter among dozens of destroyed Iraqi armored vehicles littering the city.


"All of them were wearing masks," says Abbas Mohsin, a teenage cousin of a drink seller 50 yards away, said referring to the US military cleanup crew. "They told the people there were toxic materials ... and advised my cousin not to sell Pepsi and soft drinks in this area. They said they were concerned for our safety."


Despite the troops' bulldozing of contaminated earth away from the burnt vehicles, black piles of pure DU ash and particles are still present at the site. The toxic residue, if inhaled or ingested, is considered by scientists to be the most dangerous form of DU.


One pile of jet-black dust yielded a digital readout of 9,839 radioactive emissions in one minute, more than 300 times average background levels registered by the Geiger counter. Another pile of dust reached 11,585 emissions in a minute.


Western journalists who spent a night nearby on April 10, the day after Baghdad fell, were warned by US soldiers not to cross the road to this site, because bodies and unexploded ordnance remained, along with DU contamination. It was here that the Monitor found the "hot" DU tank round.


This burned dart pushed the radiation meter to the far edge of the "red zone" limit.


A similar DU tank round recovered in Saudi Arabia in 1991, that was found by a US Army radiological team to be emitting 260 to 270 millirads of radiation per hour. Their safety memo noted that the "current [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission] limit for non-radiation workers is 100 millirads per year."


The normal public dose limit in the US, and recognized around much of the world, is 100 millirems per year. Nuclear workers have guidelines 20 to 30 times as high as that.


The depleted-uranium bullets are made of low-level radioactive nuclear-waste material, left over from the making of nuclear fuel and weapons. It is 1.7 times as dense as lead, and burns its way easily through armor. But it is controversial because it leaves a trail of contamination that has half-life of 4.5 billion years - the age of our solar system.
Less DU in this war?

In the first Gulf War, US forces used 320 tons of DU, 80 percent of it fired by A-10 aircraft. Some estimates suggest 1,000 tons or more of DU was used in the current war. But the Pentagon disclosure Wednesday that about 75 tons of A-10 DU bullets were used points to a smaller overall DU tonnage in Iraq this time.


US military guidelines developed after the first Gulf War - which have since been considerably eased - required any soldier coming within 50 yards of a tank struck with DU to wear a gas mask and full protective suit. Today, soldiers say they have been told to steer clear of any DU.


"If a [tank] was taken out by depleted uranium, there may be oxide that you don't want to inhale. We want to minimize any exposure, at least to the lowest level possible," Dr. Michael Kilpatrick, a top Pentagon health official told journalists on March 14, just days before the war began. "If somebody needs to go into a tank that's been hit with depleted uranium, a dust mask, a handkerchief is adequate to protect them - washing their hands afterwards."


Not everyone on the battlefield may be as well versed in handling DU, Dr. Kilpatrick said, noting that his greater concern is DU's chemical toxicity, not its radioactivity: "What we worry about like lead in paint in housing areas - children picking it up and eating it or licking it - getting it on their hands and ingesting it."


In the US, stringent NRC rules govern any handling of DU, which can legally only be disposed of in low-level radioactive waste dumps. The US military holds more than a dozen NRC licenses to work with it.


In Iraq, DU was not just fired at armored targets.


Video footage from the last days of the war shows an A-10 aircraft - a plane purpose-built around a 30-mm Gatling gun - strafing the Iraqi Ministry of Planning in downtown Baghdad.


A visit to site yields dozens of spent radioactive DU rounds, and distinctive aluminum casings with two white bands, that drilled into the tile and concrete rear of the building. DU residue at impact clicked on the Geiger counter at a relatively low level, just 12 times background radiation levels.
Hot bullets

But the finger-sized bullets themselves - littering the ground where looters and former staff are often walking - were the "hottest" items the Monitor measured in Iraq, at nearly 1,900 times background levels.


The site is just 300 yards from where American troops guard the main entrance of the Republican Palace, home to the US and British officials tasked with rebuilding Iraq.


"Radioactive? Oh, really?" asks a former director general of the ministry, when he returned in a jacket and tie for a visit last week, and heard the contamination levels register in bursts on the Geiger counter.


"Yesterday more than 1,000 employees came here, and they didn't know anything about it," the former official says. "We have started to not believe what the American government says. What I know is that the occupiers should clean up and take care of the country they invaded."


US military officials often say that most people are exposed to natural or "background" radiation n daily life. For example, a round-trip flight across the US can yield a 5 millirem dose from increased cosmic radiation; a chest X-ray can yield a 10 millirem dose in a few seconds.


The Pentagon says that, since DU is "depleted" and 40 percent less radioactive than normal uranium, it presents even less of a hazard.


But DU experts say they are most concerned at how DU is transformed on the battlefield, after burning, into a toxic oxide dust that emits alpha particles. While those can be easily stopped by the skin, once inside the body, studies have shown that they can destroy cells in soft tissue. While one study on rats linked DU fragments in muscle tissue to increased cancer risk, health effects on humans remain inconclusive.


As late as five days before the Iraq war began, Pentagon officials said that 90 of those troops most heavily exposed to DU during the 1991 Gulf War have shown no health problems whatsoever, and remain under close medical scrutiny.


Released documents and past admissions from military officials, however, estimate that around 900 Americans were exposed to DU. Only a fraction have been watched, and among those has been one diagnosed case of lymphatic cancer, and one arm tumor. As reported in previous articles, the Monitor has spoken to American veterans who blame their DU exposure for serious health problems.
The politics of DU

But DU health concerns are very often wrapped up in politics. Saddam Hussein's regime blamed DU used in 1991 for causing a spike in the cancer rate and birth defects in southern Iraq.


And the Pentagon often overstates its case - in terms of DU effectiveness on the battlefield, or declaring the absence of health problems, according to Dan Fahey, an American veterans advocate who has monitored the shrill arguments from both sides since the mid-1990s.


"DU munitions are neither the benign wonder weapons promoted by Pentagon propagandists nor the instruments of genocide decried by hyperbolic anti-DU activists," Mr. Fahey writes in a March report, called "Science or Science Fiction: Facts, Myth and Propaganda in the Debate Over DU Weapons."


Nonetheless, Rep. Jim McDermott (D) of Washington, a doctor who visited Baghdad before the war, introduced legislation in Congress last month requiring studies on health and environment studies, and clean up of DU contamination in the US. He says DU may well be associated with increased birth defects.


"While the political effects of using DU munitions are perhaps more apparent than their health and environmental effects," Fahey writes, "science and common sense dictate it is unwise to use a weapon that distributes large quantities of a toxic waste in areas where people live, work, grow food, or draw water."


Because of the publicity the Iraqi government has given to the issue, Iraqis worry about DU.


"It is an important concern.... We know nothing about it. How can I protect my family?" asks Faiz Askar, an Iraqi doctor. "We say the war is finished, but what will the future bring?"


VERSION FRANCAIS

Restes de civière toxique Irak de balles
Le moniteur trouve les niveaux élevés du rayonnement gauches par les coquilles armor-piercing des USA.

Par Scott Peterson |Auteur de personnel du moniteur chrétien de la Science

BAGDAD - à un stand de produit de bord de la route sur les périphéries de Bagdad, les affaires sont vives pour Latifa Khalaf Hamid. Les conducteurs irakiens tirent vers le haut et se cassent vers le haut des groupes frais de persil, menthe part, aneth, et tiges d'oignon.


Mais le stand de mme. Hamid's est juste quatre pas loin d'un réservoir irakien brûlé-dehors, par détruites - et souillé avec - balles américaines controversées de l'épuiser-uranium (du). Les enfants locaux jouent "tout au long de la journée" sur le réservoir, Hamid indique, et sur encore à travers la route.


Personne n'a averti le fournisseur dans la robe noire fané, de threadbare pour garder la poussière toxique et radioactive outre de son produit. Les enfants n'ont pas été dits pour ne pas jouer avec les débris radioactifs. Ils se réunissent autour pendant que Geiger que le compteur a porté par un journaliste visitant commence à chanter quand il s'approche d'un fragment de DU bullet pas plus grand qu'une gomme à effacer de crayon. Il enregistre presque 1.000 niveaux normaux de rayonnement de fond de périodes sur l'afficheur numérique.


Le moniteur a visité quatre emplacements dans la ville - comprenant deux véhicules blindés irakiens détruits aléatoirement choisis, un embrayage des camions américains brûlés de munitions, et le ministère du centre de planification - et les niveaux significatifs trouvés de la contamination radioactive à partir des USA luttent pour Bagdad.


Dans la première révélation partielle du Pentagone de la quantité de du utilisée en Irak, un porte-parole central de commande des USA a dit le moniteur qu'avion d'A-10 Warthog - les mêmes avions qui ont tiré au ministère irakien de planification - mis le feu 300.000 balles. Le mélange normal de combat pour ces ronds 30-millimètre est cinq DU bullets à 1 - un mélange qui aurait laissé environ 75 tonnes de du en Irak.


Le moniteur a vu que seulement un emplacement où les USA s'assemblent avait mis vers le haut des avertissements manuscrits dans l'arabe pour que les Irakiens restent loin. Là, 3-foot-long DU dart d'une coquille de réservoir de 120 millimètres, s'est avéré produire le rayonnement à plus de 1.300 niveaux de fond de périodes. Il a transformé le tour d'éclats du staccato de l'instrument en un gémissement régulier.


de "si vous avez des morceaux ou même des penetrators [ du ] entiers autour, ce n'est pas un risque sanitaire aigu, mais il est pour sûr au-dessus des niveaux de dose de radioprotection," dit Werner Burkart, le directeur général allemand de député les sciences nucléaires et des applications à l'Agence internationale de l'énergie atomique de l'un (l'cAiea) à Vienne. "la chose importante dans n'importe quel champ de bataille - particulièrement dans des secteurs urbains peuplés - est quelqu'un doit nettoyer ces emplacements."
Réduire au minimum le risque

des coquilles d'Frais-de-$$$-fresh-from-the-factory DU tank sont normalement manipulées avec des gants, pour réduire au minimum le risque sanitaire, et protégées avec un enduit mince. Le rayonnement de particules d'alpha émis par du voyage moins que pouce et peut être arrêté par le tissu ou même le papier de soie de soie. Mais quand le DUmaterial brûle (habituellement sur l'impact; ou comme poussière, il peut spontanément mettre à feu) les boucliers protecteurs disparaissent, et des oxydes radioactifs dangereux sont créés qui peuvent être inhalés ou ingérés.


"[ le risque ] dépend tellement infiniment de la façon dont vous le manipulez," dit janv. Olof Snihs, de l'autorité de radioprotection de la Suède à Stockholm. Dans la plupart des cas les dangers sont bas, il dit, à moins que les enfants mangent le sol toxique et radioactif, ou obtient DU oxides sur leurs mains.


Les particules radioactives sont "un risque spécial lié à une guerre," M. Snihs dit. "les autorités devraient se rendre compte de ceci, et essayent aux endroits de decontaminate comme ceci, d'éviter juste le risque inutile."


Les fonctionnaires du Pentagone déclarent que du est relativement inoffensif et une partie nécessaire de guerre moderne. Ils disent que des études de guerre de pré-Golfe qui ont indiqué un risque de cancer et de causer le mal aux populations locales par la contamination permanente ont été remplacées par de plus nouveaux rapports.


"il n'y a pas vraiment aucun danger, au moins cela que nous savons, pour le peuple de l'Irak," a dit lieutenant Col. Michael Sigmon, chirurgien de député pour les corps de V de l'armée des USA, dit des journalistes à Bagdad la semaine dernière. Il a affirmé que les enfants jouant avec les coquilles dépensées de réservoir devraient manger et puis suffoquer pratiquement sur DU residue pour causer le mal.


Mais il y a un chorus croissant de souci parmi les Nations Unies et des fonctionnaires de soulagement, avec quelques experts scientifiques occidentaux, qui réclament des emplacements souillés avec du soient cochés et coffre-fort fait.


"le sol autour des emplacements d'impact des penetrators [ du ] peut être fortement souillé, et pourrait être nocif si avalé par des enfants," dit Brian Spratt, chaise du groupe de travail sur du à la société royale, établissement scientifique du premier ministre de la Grande-Bretagne.
Jouets de métal lourd?

Des fragments et les penetrators devraient être enlevés, depuis des "enfants trouvez-les les objets fascinants, et la poche de bidon ils," indique professeur Spratt. "la science indique qu'il y a un certain danger - pas peut-être un danger énorme - de ces objets... Nous certainement ne disons pas que ces choses sont sûres; nous disons que le nettoyage est important."


Le ministère britannique de la défense indique qu'il offrira le criblage aux soldats suspectés de DU exposure, et éditera des détails au sujet des endroits et des quantités de du que les troupes britanniques ont employées en Irak - une fraction minuscule de cela mise le feu par des forces des USA.


Le Pentagone a traditionnellement été serré-lipped au sujet de du: Des figures officielles sur la quantité utilisée n'ont pas été libérées pendant des années après les conflits de la guerre du Golfe 1991 et de la Bosnie, et presque une année après la campagne 1999 de Kosovo. Aucun fonctionnaire des USA contacté ne pourrait fournir des évaluations d'utilisation de du de la dernière guerre en Irak.


"la première chose que nous devrions demander [ les militaires des USA ] doit enlever qu'immédiatement," dit Carel de Rooy, tête des fonds des enfants de l'cOnu à Bagdad, ajoutant que les fonctionnaires aînés de l'cOnu ont besoin du conseil pressant sur éviter l'exposition.


Le programme d'environnement de l'cOnu le mois dernier a réclamé des essais sur le terrain. Du "est toujours une issue de grand souci pour le grand public," a dit UNEP Klaus en chef Töpfer. "une étude tôt en Irak pourrait étendre ces craintes pour reposer ou confirmer qu'il y a en effet des risques potentiels."
Les troupes des USA évitent l'épave

Pendant les derniers réservoirs d'Abrams de conflit de l'Irak, les véhicules de combat de Bradley et l'avion d'A-10 Warthog, entre d'autres plateformes militaires, ont tout mis le feu à DU bullets des zones de guerre de désert au coeur de Bagdad. Aucun autre rond armor-piercing n'est comme efficace contre les réservoirs ennemis. Tandis que le Pentagone indique il n'y a aucun risque aux résidants de Bagdad, les soldats des USA prennent leurs propres précautions en Irak, et dans certains cas ont distribueré les feuillets d'avertissement et ont mis signe vers le haut.


"après que nous tirons quelque chose avec du, nous ne sommes pas censés le circuler, étant donné qu'il pourrait causer le cancer," dit un sergeant à Bagdad de New York, assigné à un Bradley, qui a demandé à ne pas être encore identifié.


"nous ne savons pas les effets de ce qu'il pourrait faire," dit le sergeant. "si un de nos véhicules brûlait avec un intérieur rond de du, ou un camion de munitions, nous n'irions pas près de lui, même si il avait les documents importants à l'intérieur. Nous le jouons sûr."


Six véhicules américains ont heurté avec du "le feu qu'amical" dans 1991 ont été considérés pour être trop souillés pour prendre la maison, et ont été enterrés en Arabie Saoudite. De 16 davantage apportés de nouveau à un service sur mesure en Caroline du Sud, six ont dû être enterrés dans une décharge de bas niveau de déchets radioactifs.


La longueur de télévision de la guerre le mois dernier a montré les véhicules blindés irakiens brûlant pendant que les colonnes des USA conduisaient près, un signe commun d'une grève par du, qui brûle par l'armure sur l'impact, et met à feu souvent les munitions portées en le véhicule visé.


"nous avons été boutonnés vers le haut de quand nous avons conduit par que - toutes nos trappes étaient fermées," le sergeant des USA dit. "si nous voyions n'importe quoi sur le feu, nous ne nous arrêterions pas n'importe où près de lui. Nous continuerions juste à la conduite."


C'est une option qui produisent le vendeur que Hamid n'a pas.


Elle dit que les USA ont cassé sa promesse de ne pas bombarder des civils. Elle a trouvé des bombettes de faisceau des USA dans son jardin; du est juste un autre fardeau dangereux, dont dans une guerre au sujet elle reste sceptique.


"on nous l'a dit que allait être le paradis [ quand Saddam Hussein a été renversé ], et maintenant ils tuent nos enfants," elle dit exprimer une perception irakienne commune au sujet du risque de du. "les Américains n'ont pas pris la peine de nous avertir que c'est un secteur souillé."


Il y a un avertissement maintenant à l'intersection de Doura sur les périphéries méridionales de Bagdad. En jours avant que le capital soit tombé, quatre camions d'approvisionnement des USA ont groupé près d'un choix du feu attrapé parrampes de route, faisant cuire outre d'un certain nombre de DU tank arrondit.


Les troupes américaines portant des facemasks pour la protection sont arrivées quelques jours plus tard et bulldozed le terrain végétal autour de l'emplacement pour limiter la contamination.


Les troupes ont attaché du ruban adhésif aux panneaux d'avertissement manuscrits en arabe aux véhicules brûlés, qui ont indiqué: "danger - obtenez loin de ce secteur." C'étaient les seuls avertissements vus par ce journaliste parmi des douzaines de véhicules blindés irakiens détruits salissant la ville.


"tous portaient des masques," dit Abbas Mohsin, un cousin d'adolescent d'un vendeur de boissons 50 yards loin, dit se rapportant à l'équipage militaire de nettoyage des USA. "ils ont indiqué le peuple là étaient les matériaux toxiques... et ont conseillé mon cousin de ne pas vendre Pepsi-cola et boissons non alcooliques dans ce secteur. Ils ont dit qu'ils ont été concernés pour notre sûreté."


En dépit de bulldozing des troupes de la terre souillée loin des véhicules brûlés, les piles noires de DU ash pur et les particules sont encore présentes à l'emplacement. Le résidu toxique, s'inhalé ou ingéré, est considéré comme étant par des scientifiques la forme la plus dangereuse de du.


Une pile de la poussière noire comme jais a rapporté un afficheur numérique de 9.839 émissions radioactives en une minute, plus de 300 niveaux moyens de fond de périodes enregistrés par le compteur de Geiger. Une autre pile de la poussière a atteint 11.585 émissions dans une minute.


Des journalistes occidentaux qui ont passé une nuit tout près avril 10, le jour après que Bagdad soit tombé, ont été avertis par des soldats des USA de ne pas traverser la route à cet emplacement, parce que des corps et unexploded l'artillerie sont restés, avec DU contamination. C'était ici que le moniteur a trouvé DU tank "chaud" rond.


Ce dard brûlé a poussé le mètre de rayonnement au bord lointain de la limite "de zone rouge".


Un rond semblable de DU tank récupéré en Arabie Saoudite en 1991, celui s'est avéré par une équipe radiologique d'armée des USA émettre 260 à 270 millirads de rayonnement par heure. Leur note de sûreté a noté que "[ la limite courante de la Commission de normalisation nucléaire des USA ] pour des ouvriers de non-rayonnement est 100 millirads par an."


La limite publique normale de dose aux USA, et reconnu autour de une grande partie du monde, est 100 millirems par an. Les ouvriers nucléaires ont des directives 20 à 30 fois plus hautes que celle.


Les balles d'épuiser-uranium sont faites en radioactif de bas niveau nucléaire-gaspillent le matériel, l'excédent gauche de la fabrication du carburant nucléaire et les armes. Il est 1,7 temps plus denses que le fil, et brûle sa manière facilement par l'armure. Mais il est controversé parce qu'il laisse une traînée de la contamination qui a la demi vie de 4,5 milliards d'ans - l'âge de notre système solaire.
Less DU in this war?

In the first Gulf War, US forces used 320 tons of DU, 80 percent of it fired by A-10 aircraft. Some estimates suggest 1,000 tons or more of DU was used in the current war. But the Pentagon disclosure Wednesday that about 75 tons of A-10 DU bullets were used points to a smaller overall DU tonnage in Iraq this time.


US military guidelines developed after the first Gulf War - which have since been considerably eased - required any soldier coming within 50 yards of a tank struck with DU to wear a gas mask and full protective suit. Today, soldiers say they have been told to steer clear of any DU.


"If a [tank] was taken out by depleted uranium, there may be oxide that you don't want to inhale. We want to minimize any exposure, at least to the lowest level possible," Dr. Michael Kilpatrick, a top Pentagon health official told journalists on March 14, just days before the war began. "If somebody needs to go into a tank that's been hit with depleted uranium, a dust mask, a handkerchief is adequate to protect them - washing their hands afterwards."


Not everyone on the battlefield may be as well versed in handling DU, Dr. Kilpatrick said, noting that his greater concern is DU's chemical toxicity, not its radioactivity: "What we worry about like lead in paint in housing areas - children picking it up and eating it or licking it - getting it on their hands and ingesting it."


In the US, stringent NRC rules govern any handling of DU, which can legally only be disposed of in low-level radioactive waste dumps. The US military holds more than a dozen NRC licenses to work with it.


In Iraq, DU was not just fired at armored targets.


Video footage from the last days of the war shows an A-10 aircraft - a plane purpose-built around a 30-mm Gatling gun - strafing the Iraqi Ministry of Planning in downtown Baghdad.


A visit to site yields dozens of spent radioactive DU rounds, and distinctive aluminum casings with two white bands, that drilled into the tile and concrete rear of the building. DU residue at impact clicked on the Geiger counter at a relatively low level, just 12 times background radiation levels.
Hot bullets

But the finger-sized bullets themselves - littering the ground where looters and former staff are often walking - were the "hottest" items the Monitor measured in Iraq, at nearly 1,900 times background levels.


The site is just 300 yards from where American troops guard the main entrance of the Republican Palace, home to the US and British officials tasked with rebuilding Iraq.


"Radioactive? Oh, really?" asks a former director general of the ministry, when he returned in a jacket and tie for a visit last week, and heard the contamination levels register in bursts on the Geiger counter.


"Yesterday more than 1,000 employees came here, and they didn't know anything about it," the former official says. "We have started to not believe what the American government says. What I know is that the occupiers should clean up and take care of the country they invaded."


US military officials often say that most people are exposed to natural or "background" radiation n daily life. For example, a round-trip flight across the US can yield a 5 millirem dose from increased cosmic radiation; a chest X-ray can yield a 10 millirem dose in a few seconds.


The Pentagon says that, since DU is "depleted" and 40 percent less radioactive than normal uranium, it presents even less of a hazard.


But DU experts say they are most concerned at how DU is transformed on the battlefield, after burning, into a toxic oxide dust that emits alpha particles. While those can be easily stopped by the skin, once inside the body, studies have shown that they can destroy cells in soft tissue. While one study on rats linked DU fragments in muscle tissue to increased cancer risk, health effects on humans remain inconclusive.


As late as five days before the Iraq war began, Pentagon officials said that 90 of those troops most heavily exposed to DU during the 1991 Gulf War have shown no health problems whatsoever, and remain under close medical scrutiny.


Released documents and past admissions from military officials, however, estimate that around 900 Americans were exposed to DU. Only a fraction have been watched, and among those has been one diagnosed case of lymphatic cancer, and one arm tumor. As reported in previous articles, the Monitor has spoken to American veterans who blame their DU exposure for serious health problems.
The politics of DU

But DU health concerns are very often wrapped up in politics. Saddam Hussein's regime blamed DU used in 1991 for causing a spike in the cancer rate and birth defects in southern Iraq.


And the Pentagon often overstates its case - in terms of DU effectiveness on the battlefield, or declaring the absence of health problems, according to Dan Fahey, an American veterans advocate who has monitored the shrill arguments from both sides since the mid-1990s.


"DU munitions are neither the benign wonder weapons promoted by Pentagon propagandists nor the instruments of genocide decried by hyperbolic anti-DU activists," Mr. Fahey writes in a March report, called "Science or Science Fiction: Facts, Myth and Propaganda in the Debate Over DU Weapons."


Nonetheless, Rep. Jim McDermott (D) of Washington, a doctor who visited Baghdad before the war, introduced legislation in Congress last month requiring studies on health and environment studies, and clean up of DU contamination in the US. He says DU may well be associated with increased birth defects.


"While the political effects of using DU munitions are perhaps more apparent than their health and environmental effects," Fahey writes, "science and common sense dictate it is unwise to use a weapon that distributes large quantities of a toxic waste in areas where people live, work, grow food, or draw water."


Because of the publicity the Iraqi government has given to the issue, Iraqis worry about DU.


"It is an important concern.... We know nothing about it. How can I protect my family?" asks Faiz Askar, an Iraqi doctor. "We say the war is finished, but what will the future bring?"


Posted by gh at 11:12 AM | Comments (164)

Serge Dassault gets dressed as boss of press.
Serge Dassault s'habille en patron de presse.


Avec le rachat de la Socpresse, l'avionneur devient un géant des médias français. Mainmise d'un industriel très politique qui suscite nombre d'inquiétudes.
par Olivier COSTEMALLE et Catherine MALLAVAL et Olivier BERTRAND, liberation.fr

-----------------------------------

With the repurchase of Socpresse, the aircraft manufacturer becomes a giant of the French media. Seizure of a very political manufacturer who arouses number of anxieties.
by Olivier COSTEMALLE et Catherine MALLAVAL et Olivier BERTRAND, liberation.fr
__________________________________________________________________

Posted by renaud at 05:13 AM | Comments (54)

June 21, 2004

Élections européennes : un désaveu.
European elections: a denial.

The result of the European ballot is revealing of a deep crisis of the European construction. Its scale is such, its consequences can be so grave, as it would be as well vain to deny the symptoms as to minimize the meaning. It would be take a denial heading for a simple disillusionment.

by Michel Soudais, politis.fr

European elections: a denial. In english


Le résultat du scrutin européen est révélateur d’une crise profonde de la construction européenne. Son ampleur est telle, ses conséquences peuvent être si graves, qu’il serait aussi vain d’en nier les symptômes que d’en minimiser la signification. Ce serait prendre un désaveu cinglant pour un simple désenchantement.

par Michel Soudais, politis.fr

Elections Européennes: un désaveu

Posted by renaud at 02:01 PM | Comments (128)

June 17, 2004

US War Criminals

This is what America has come to, arrogant and drunk with moral justification.

The New York Times > Washington > Prison Abuse: Rumsfeld Issued an Order to Hide Detainee in Iraq

Rumsfeld Issued an Order to Hide Detainee in Iraq
By ERIC SCHMITT and THOM SHANKER

Published: June 17, 2004

ASHINGTON, June 16 - Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, acting at the request of George J. Tenet, the director of central intelligence, ordered military officials in Iraq last November to hold a man suspected of being a senior Iraqi terrorist at a high-level detention center there but not list him on the prison's rolls, senior Pentagon and intelligence officials said Wednesday.
Version traduite de la page http://www.nytimes.com/2004/06/17/politics/17abuse.html?hp=

Rumsfeld Issued an Order to Hide Detainee in Iraq
By ERIC SCHMITT and THOM SHANKER

(version Francais la bas)

WASHINGTON, June 16 - Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, acting at the request of George J. Tenet, the director of central intelligence, ordered military officials in Iraq last November to hold a man suspected of being a senior Iraqi terrorist at a high-level detention center there but not list him on the prison's rolls, senior Pentagon and intelligence officials said Wednesday.


This prisoner and other "ghost detainees" were hidden largely to prevent the International Committee of the Red Cross from monitoring their treatment, and to avoid disclosing their location to an enemy, officials said.


Maj. Gen. Antonio M. Taguba, the Army officer who in February investigated abuses at the Abu Ghraib prison, criticized the practice of allowing ghost detainees there and at other detention centers as "deceptive, contrary to Army doctrine, and in violation of international law."


This prisoner, who has not been named, is believed to be the first to have been kept off the books at the orders of Mr. Rumsfeld and Mr. Tenet. He was not held at Abu Ghraib, but at another prison, Camp Cropper, on the outskirts of Baghdad International Airport, officials said.


Pentagon and intelligence officials said the decision to hold the detainee without registering him - at least initially - was in keeping with the administration's legal opinion about the status of those viewed as an active threat in wartime.


Seven months later, however, the detainee - a reputed senior officer of Ansar al-Islam, a group the United States has linked to Al Qaeda and blames for some attacks in Iraq - is still languishing at the prison but has only been questioned once while in detention, in what government officials acknowledged was an extraordinary lapse.


"Once he was placed in military custody, people lost track of him," a senior intelligence official conceded Wednesday night. "The normal review processes that would keep track of him didn't."


The detainee was described by the official as someone "who was actively planning operations specifically targeting U.S. forces and interests both inside and outside of Iraq."


But once he was placed into custody at Camp Cropper, where about 100 detainees deemed to have the highest intelligence value are held, he received only one cursory arrival interrogation from military officers and was never again questioned by any other military or intelligence officers, according to Pentagon and intelligence officials.


The Pentagon's chief spokesman, Lawrence Di Rita, said Wednesday that officials at Camp Cropper questioned their superiors several times in recent months about what to do with the suspect.


But only in the last two weeks has Mr. Rumsfeld's top aide for intelligence policy, Stephen A. Cambone, called C.I.A. senior officials to request that the agency deal with the suspect or else have him go into the prison's regular reporting system.


Mr. Di Rita referred questions about the prisoner's fate to the C.I.A.


A senior intelligence official said late Wednesday that "the matter is currently under discussion."


In July 2003, the man suspected of being an Ansar al-Islam official was captured in Iraq and turned over to C.I.A. officials, who took him to an undisclosed location outside of Iraq for interrogation. By that fall, however, a C.I.A. legal analysis determined that because the detainee was deemed to be an Iraqi unlawful combatant - outside the protections of the Geneva Conventions - he should be transferred back to Iraq.


Mr. Tenet made his request to Mr. Rumsfeld - that the suspect be held but not listed - in October. The request was passed down the chain of command: to Gen. Richard B. Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, then to Gen. John P. Abizaid, the commander of American forces in the Middle East, and finally to Lt. Gen. Ricardo S. Sanchez, the ground commander in Iraq. At each stage, lawyers reviewed the request and their bosses approved it.


A senior intelligence official said late Wednesday that the C.I.A. inquired about the detainee's status in January, but was told that American jailers in Iraq could not find him, perhaps as a result of the chaos and confusion of the November and December spike in insurgent violence.


The detention was first reported in this week's U.S. News & World Report. But the role played by senior officials in deciding the detainee's status was not known publicly before Wednesday. Pentagon and intelligence officials gave new details on Wednesday about the prisoner and the circumstances that brought him to Camp Cropper, including the fact that his status was decided by Mr. Tenet and Mr. Rumsfeld, and approved by senior officers.


While acknowledging mistakes in the prisoner's detention, the senior intelligence official said the detainee posed a significant threat to American forces in Iraq and elsewhere. "He also possessed significant information about Ansar al Islam's leadership structure, training and locations," the official said.


At Camp Cropper, some prisoners had been held since June 2003 for nearly 23 hours a day in solitary confinement in small cells without sunlight, according to a report by the international Red Cross.


The suspected Ansar official was segregated from the other detainees and was not listed on the rolls. Under the order that had filtered down to General Sanchez, military police were not to disclose the detainee's whereabouts to the Red Cross pending further directives.


The prisoner fell into legal limbo as the military police pressed their superiors for guidance, which has still not formally come.


"Over the course of the next several weeks, the custodians at the prison asked for additional guidance, but there were no interrogations," Mr. Di Rita said.


Before this case surfaced, the C.I.A. has said it had discontinued the ghost detainee practice, but said that the Geneva Conventions allowed a delay in the identification of prisoners to avoid disclosing their whereabouts to an enemy.


In Washington, the Army announced that Gen. Paul J. Kern, the head of the Army Matériel Command, would oversee an Army inquiry into the role military intelligence soldiers played in the abuses at Abu Ghraib. General Kern replaces General Sanchez as the senior officer reviewing the findings. General Sanchez removed himself from that role so he could be interviewed by investigators.
WASHINGTON, juin 16 - le secrétaire Donald H. Rumsfeld de la défense, agissant sur demande de George J. Tenet, directeur d'intelligence centrale, de fonctionnaires militaires commandés en Irak novembre passé de juger un homme suspecté d'être un terroriste irakien aîné à un centre à niveau élevé de détention là mais de ne pas l'énumérer sur les roulements de la prison, de Pentagone aîné et de fonctionnaires d'intelligence a dit mercredi.


Ce prisonnier et d'autres "détenus de fantôme" ont été cachés en grande partie pour empêcher le Comité international de la croix rouge de surveiller leur traitement, et pour l'éviter de révéler leur endroit à un ennemi, fonctionnaires dits.


M. Taguba, l'officier de commandant Gen. Antonio d'armée qui en février a étudié des abus à la prison d'Abu Ghraib, critiqué la pratique de permettre des détenus de fantôme là et à d'autres centres de détention comme "trompeurs, contrairement à la doctrine d'armée, et dans la violation du droit international."


Ce prisonnier, on pense que qui n'a pas été appelé, est le premier avoir été retenu les livres aux ordres de M. Rumsfeld et de M. Tenet. Il n'a pas été tenu chez Abu Ghraib, mais à une autre prison, tondeur de camp, sur les périphéries de l'aéroport international de Bagdad, fonctionnaires dits.


Les fonctionnaires du Pentagone et d'intelligence ont déclaré que la décision pour tenir le détenu sans l'enregistrer - au moins au commencement - était en accord avec l'opinion légale de l'administration au sujet du statut de ceux vus comme menace active en temps de guerre.


Pendant sept mois plus tard, cependant, le détenu - un officier aîné réputé de l'Al-Islam d'Ansar, un groupe que les Etats-Unis ont lié à Al Qaeda et blâme pour quelques attaques en Irak - languishing à la prison mais seulement a été interrogé toujours une fois tandis que dans la détention, dans quels fonctionnaires de gouvernement reconnus était une faute extraordinaire.


"une fois qu'il était placé dans la garde militaire, les gens ont perdu la voie de lui," d'intelligence mercredi concédée par fonctionnaire aîné nuit. "les processus de revue de normale qui le maintiendraient pas."


Le détenu a été décrit par le fonctionnaire en tant que quelqu'un "qui activement projetait des opérations visant spécifiquement des forces des ETATS-UNIS et intéresse tous les deux intérieurs et extérieurs de l'Irak."


Mais une fois qu'il a été placé dans la garde au tondeur de camp, où environ 100 détenus considérés avoir la valeur d'intelligence la plus élevée sont tenus, il a reçu seulement une interrogation cursive d'arrivée des officiers militaires et jamais a été de nouveau interrogé par tous les autres militaires ou officiers d'intelligence, selon le Pentagone et des fonctionnaires d'intelligence.


Le porte-parole en chef du Pentagone, Laurent Di Rita, a dit mercredi que les fonctionnaires au tondeur de camp ont interrogé leurs supérieurs plusieurs fois ces derniers mois au sujet de quoi faire avec le suspect.


Mais seulement en deux dernières semaines a l'aide supérieur de M. Rumsfeld's pour la politique d'intelligence, Stephen A. Cambone, appelé la C.i.a les hauts fonctionnaires pour demander que l'affaire d'agence avec le suspect ou bien le fait entrer dans le système de reportage régulier de la prison.


M. Di Rita s'est référé des questions au sujet du destin du prisonnier à la C.i.a.


Une intelligence aînée défunt mercredi officiel qui "la matière est actuellement à l'étude."


En juillet 2003, l'homme suspecté d'être un fonctionnaire de l'Al-Islam d'Ansar a été capturé en Irak et retourné aux fonctionnaires de la C.i.a, qui l'ont porté à un endroit non révélé en dehors de de l'Irak pour l'interrogation. Par cet automne, cependant, une analyse légale de la C.i.a a déterminé que parce que le détenu a été considéré être un combattant illégal irakien - en dehors des protections des conventions de Genève - il devrait être transféré de nouveau à l'Irak.


M. Tenet a fait sa demande à M. Rumsfeld que le suspect soit tenu mais pas énuméré - en octobre. La demande a été passée en bas de la chaîne de la commande: à Gen. Richard B. Myers, Président des chefs du personnel communs, puis à Gen. John P. Abizaid, commandant des forces américaines dans le Moyen-Orient, et finalement à S. Sanchez, commandant moulu de lieutenant Gen. Ricardo en Irak. À chaque étape, les avocats ont passé en revue la demande et leurs patrons l'ont approuvée.


Une intelligence aînée défunt mercredi officiel qu'on a dite la C.i.a enquise au sujet du statut du détenu en janvier, mais que les jailers américains en Irak ne pourraient pas le trouver, peut-être en raison du chaos et de la confusion de la transitoire de novembre et de décembre dans la violence insurgée.


La détention a été rapportée la première fois dans les nouvelles des ETATS-UNIS de cette semaine et le rapport du monde. Mais le rôle joué par de hauts fonctionnaires en décidant le statut du détenu n'a pas été connu publiquement avant mercredi. Les fonctionnaires du Pentagone et d'intelligence ont donné de nouveaux détails mercredi au sujet du prisonnier et des circonstances qui l'ont apporté au tondeur de camp, y compris le fait que son statut a été décidé par M. Tenet et M. Rumsfeld, et approuvé par les officiers aînés.


Tandis que les erreurs de reconnaître dans la détention du prisonnier, l'intelligence aînée officielle indiquaient le détenu a constitué une menace significative aux forces américaines en Irak et ailleurs. "il a également possédé des informations significatives sur la structure, la formation et les endroits de la conduite de l'Islam d'Al d'Ansar," le fonctionnaire dit.


Au tondeur de camp, quelques prisonniers avaient été tenus depuis juin 2003 pendant presque 23 heures par jour dans l'emprisonnement solitaire en petites cellules sans lumière du soleil, selon un rapport par la croix rouge internationale.


Le fonctionnaire suspecté d'Ansar a été isolé des autres détenus et n'a pas été énuméré sur les roulements. Sous l'ordre qui avait filtré vers le bas au Général Sanchez, la police militaire ne devait pas révéler le détenu où aux directives supplémentaires en attente de croix rouge.


Le prisonnier est tombé dans le limbo légal pendant que la police militaire serrait leurs supérieurs pour les conseils, qui toujours formellement ne sont pas venu.


"en plusieurs semaines suivantes, les gardiens à la prison ont demandé des conseils additionnels, mais il n'y avait aucune interrogation," M. Di Rita dit.


Avant que ce cas ait apprêté, la C.i.a a indiqué qu'elle avait discontinué la pratique en matière de détenu de fantôme, mais dit que les conventions de Genève ont permis retarde dans l'identification des prisonniers pour éviter la révélation leur endroit à un ennemi.


Washington, l'armée a annoncé ce Gen. Paul J. Kern, la tête de la commande de Matériel d'armée, surveillerait une enquête d'armée dans les soldats d'intelligence militaire de rôle joués dans les abus chez Abu Ghraib. Le Général Kern remplace le Général Sanchez en tant qu'officier aîné passant en revue les résultats. Le Général Sanchez s'est enlevé de ce rôle ainsi il pourrait être interviewé par des investigateurs.

Posted by gh at 11:28 AM | Comments (53)

June 15, 2004

L'Amérique fasciste ?
Fascist America?

The case of Steve Kurtz is far from being unique, according to the documentary Liberty Bound, of the American Christine Rose.
This film, which will go out in France on June 23rd, brings back very divers testimonies: the passenger of a train warned by a policeman to have spoken too hardly about events of September 11th, about a war veteran who sees off-loading federal agents to him because his e-mails are considered "antiAmericans", a student threatened with exclusion from his university to have protested against George W. Bush's coming, etc.
Christine Rose, emulator of Michael Moore, asks the question: is after-S11 America , with the laws of exception as Patriot Act, « sinking into the fascism »?
The attack seems abrupt(steep), but we are ready to weigh for and against. Regrettably, the load of the film-maker becomes fast excessive: The film visits accommodatingly some theories of the plot then dashes into a comparison Bush / Hitler.

by Edouard LAUNET, Liberation.fr


------------------


Le cas de Steve Kurtz est loin d'être unique, à en croire le documentaire Liberty Bound, de l'Américaine Christine Rose.
Ce film, qui sortira en France le 23 juin, rapporte des témoignages très divers : le passager d'un train mis en garde par un policier pour avoir parlé trop fort des événements du 11 septembre, un ancien combattant qui voit débarquer des agents fédéraux chez lui parce que ses e-mails sont jugés «antiaméricains», un étudiant menacé d'exclusion de son université pour avoir protesté contre la venue de George W. Bush, etc.

Christine Rose, émule de Michael Moore, pose la question : l'Amérique de l'après-11 septembre, avec ses lois d'exception comme le Patriot Act, n'est-elle pas «en train de sombrer dans le fascisme» ?
L'attaque paraît abrupte, mais on est prêt à peser le pour et le contre. Hélas, la charge de la cinéaste devient vite excessive : le film visite complaisamment quelques théories du complot puis se lance dans une comparaison Bush/Hitler.

par Edouard LAUNET, Liberation.fr

Posted by renaud at 01:59 PM | Comments (55)

Joelle Aubron, ancienne membre du groupe terroriste d'extrême gauche Action Directe, enfin libre.
Former member of the extreme left-wing terrorist group "Action Directe", Joelle Aubron finally free.

Considering that its life expectation counts " in month ", the jurisdiction of parole of Douai suspended its punishment, on Monday, June 14th, for reasons of health, after seventeen years of prison.

Numerous extremly sick prisoners stay in prison in France, moreover France is condemned for several years by the European Court of Human Rights for the treatment of prisoners.
Let us hope that this first case of liberation of a person "not supported politically" (unlike Papon* and unlike Loïc Le Floch-Prigent **) does not remain exceptional...

*ancient collaborator of the Vichy politics, ancient prefect of police, mister Papon has numerous victims (Jewish then Algerian and Moroccan) on the consciousness.

** ex boss of Elf, mister Le Floch grew rich - as well as of numerous french politicians- thanks to oil and to the African dictators.

http://www.lemonde.fr/web/article/0,1-0@2-3226,36-369030,0.html

------------------

Considérant que son espérance de vie se compte "en mois", la juridiction de liberté conditionnelle de Douai a suspendu sa peine, lundi 14 juin, pour raisons de santé, après dix-sept années de prison.

De nombreux prisonniers extrèmements malades restent en prison en France, d'ailleurs la France est condamnée depuis plusieurs années par la Cour Européenne des Droits de l'Homme pour le traitement des prisonniers.
Espérons que ce premier cas de libération d'une personne "non soutenue politiquement" (à la différence de Papon* et de Loïc Le Floch-Prigent**) ne reste pas exceptionnel...

*ancien collaborateur de la politique de Vichy, ancien préfet de police, monsieur Papon a de nombreuses victimes (juifs puis algériens et marocains) sur la conscience.

**ancien patron d'Elf, monsieur Le Floch s'est enrichi -ainsi que de nombreux politiques français- grâce aux pétrole et aux dictateurs africains.

http://www.lemonde.fr/web/article/0,1-0@2-3226,36-369030,0.html

Posted by renaud at 01:50 PM | Comments (170)

June 12, 2004

How Much Oil Is Really Left?

This should be titled how the oil companies lie and you should be scared shitless. Think about it. Right now the government is saying we have forty years of oil left in the ground. If this is based on lying, oops!!

The New York Times > Business > An Oil Enigma: Production Falls Even as Reserves Rise
Version traduite de la page http://nytimes.com/2004/06/12/business/12RESE.html?hp=

June 12, 2004


An Oil Enigma: Production Falls Even as Reserves Rise
By ALEX BERENSON

For six consecutive years, ChevronTexaco has had good news for anyone worried that the world is running out of oil: the company has found more oil and natural gas than it has produced. Over that time, ChevronTexaco's proven oil and gas reserves have risen 14 percent, more than one billion barrels.


But near the bottom of ChevronTexaco's financial filings is a much less promising statistic. For each of those years, ChevronTexaco's wells have produced less oil and gas than the year before. Even as reserves have risen, the company's annual output has fallen by almost 15 percent, and the declines have continued recently despite a company promise to increase production in 2002.


ChevronTexaco is not the only big oil company whose production is falling despite rising reserves, though it has the largest gap. As consumers, economists and governments around the world wonder if oil supplies can keep pace with rising demand, production trends at the industry's publicly traded companies are not promising.


Collectively, they paint a picture of an industry that has depleted nearly all of the world's easily exploited reserves outside the Middle East and that is now struggling to sustain production, much less increase it. Fears about supply shortfalls and rising demand have already caused prices to climb about 20 percent this year, hovering around $40 a barrel. The four biggest companies own only about 4 percent of the world's reserves, which are mostly government-held, but they offer a unique glimpse of supply trends because they must disclose their reserves and production each year.


Historically, proven reserves and output have moved in tandem. Industry experts disagree why the relationship has broken down. Although the reserves are only estimates, federal rules require companies to calculate them conservatively.


Some analysts and the companies themselves take a relatively benign view of the production declines, promising that output will soon rise again as big new projects come online around the globe.


ChevronTexaco said its production had declined in part because of asset sales and production agreements that allocate it less oil when prices are high, as they are now, than when prices are low, as they were in 1998. The company says it expects production to stay flat through 2005, then begin rising in 2006 as output increases from fields in Chad, Kazakhstan, Venezuela and Angola.


But ChevronTexaco has promised to reverse its production declines before. In 2002 the company said that it expected its output to rise more than 20 percent by 2006, a forecast it has now dropped.


Royal Dutch/Shell, the world's third-largest oil company, admitted this year that it overstated its oil and gas reserves by 22 percent, the equivalent of 4.5 billion barrels of oil. Regulators and prosecutors in Europe and the United States are investigating Shell, which in March forced out Sir Philip Watts, its chairman.


Some analysts say that the debacle at Shell proves that companies sometimes bend the rules to satisfy Wall Street's intense hunger for new reserves.


In the 1990's, many public companies used aggressive accounting gimmicks — some legal, some not — to satisfy investors' demands that they report higher earnings. Oil companies face similar pressures to build reserves. And intentionally or not, some companies may have booked reserves that are not technically or economically viable, said Matt Simmons, a Houston investment banker who has warned of a potential supply crisis. Outsiders have essentially no way to know whether estimates of reserves are accurate, he said.


"We're going to have another Shell," Mr. Simmons said. "They're not the only company that got optimistic on proved reserves." Neither Mr. Simmons nor anyone else is asserting that ChevronTexaco did anything illegal.


Once a year, companies announce their "reserve replacement ratio," telling investors whether they have found enough new oil and gas during the year to make up for their production.


Energy investors scrutinize the reserve replacement ratio more closely than any other measure of corporate performance, said Fadel Gheit, senior energy analyst with Oppenheimer & Company. Every company aims to replace at least 100 percent of its production every year. And for the last decade, the industry's four giants, Exxon Mobil, BP, Shell and ChevronTexaco, have met that goal with remarkable consistency, at least until Shell's admission in January.


But outsiders cannot tell whether companies are properly estimating their reserves, Mr. Gheit said. The calculations are extremely complicated, and companies do not disclose the raw production and seismic data that would enable an outside analyst to check their estimates. Nor are the reserves subject to third-party audit.


"Reserves are very important but are extremely difficult to verify," Mr. Gheit said.


Oddly, Wall Street pays less attention to actual production, which is generally relegated to a few lines in quarterly and annual reports. But output data deserves more attention, because reserves can be manipulated more easily than production, said John H. Lichtblau, chief executive of the Petroleum Industry Research Foundation in New York.


"Reserves are an estimate of what's in the ground; production is what you see coming out of the wells," Mr. Lichtblau said. "You don't have to take their production on faith."


The fall in production at the big oil companies does not portend an immediate crisis in the industry. The four so-called supermajors produce only a small fraction of the world's oil; together, they extracted 3.2 billion barrels last year, about 10 percent of production worldwide. (Some analysts classify Total, a French company slightly smaller than ChevronTexaco, as a fifth supermajor.)


The supermajors control an even smaller share of global reserves. Together, the four companies have about 40 billion barrels of oil, or 4 percent of the world's proven reserves. They also have about 150 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, enough to produce the energy of 25 billion barrels of oil.


No one really knows how much oil remains worldwide, or whether existing fields can be quickly squeezed should more oil suddenly be needed. Estimates range from just under one trillion barrels remaining worldwide, about 34 years at current production levels, to more than two trillion.


Saudi Arabia alone says it has proven reserves of 260 billion barrels of oil.


But these estimates are far from exact. For most countries, the details of reserves and output are closely guarded secrets. During the 1980's, the members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries sharply raised their reserve estimates, because OPEC's output quotas were based in part on national reserves.


"Countries want a higher allocation, so they tweak their numbers," Mr. Gheit said. "Everybody lies about the reserve, so you want to make sure that you lie even more than the guy next to you."


On the other hand, the Securities and Exchange Commission requires companies like ChevronTexaco to disclose detailed production data and reserve estimates to their investors each year.


The S.E.C. rules are deliberately conservative and intended to prevent companies from overstating their reserves. The mere existence of oil and gas does not make a proven reserve; companies are supposed to report reserves as proven only if they can be recovered with current technology and are economically viable.


Reserves classified as proven do not have to be producing at the time. But companies must usually have made a financial commitment to bring them into production before classifying them as proven.


New discoveries, lease extensions that give a company more time to exploit a field, or a more optimistic view of a field's potential are all cause to increase reserves. On the other hand, companies must cut reserves if they think that their initial estimates have been too high.


"The studies that I have seen show there have been upward and downward revisions, but over time, the revisions have been modestly upward," said Gene Gillespie, senior energy analyst at Howard Weil. "You're measuring something that's a couple miles under the surface of the earth that you can't see. It amazes me that over time they come as close as they do."


But in the long run, actual production is the most important proof that reserves exist. And the relationship between reserves and production is weakening.


At Exxon Mobil, oil reserves rose from 9.6 billion barrels at the beginning of 1994 to 12.1 billion barrels at the start of this year, a 26 percent increase. But Exxon Mobil's production fell 2 percent, from 909 million barrels in 1994 to 893 million last year.


At ChevronTexaco, oil reserves jumped from 6.9 billion barrels at the beginning of 1994 to 7.7 billion barrels in January 1998 to 8.6 billion barrels at the start of this year. But after surging from 644 million barrels in 1994 to 757 million in 1998, production plunged to 641 million barrels last year.


At BP, the data is considerably more confusing, because the company has had so many acquisitions and sales over the last several years. Still, BP's production at its wholly owned fields has plunged to 562 million last year from 672 million barrels in 1998, while its reserves have risen to 7.5 billion from 6.5 billion over that span.


(BP, ChevronTexaco and Exxon Mobil are all the products of mergers within the last decade; the reserves and production data reflect what the companies would have done if they had existed in their current form for the entire period.)


Shell has actually increased its production slightly since 1994, despite the embarrassment of its announcement in January that it had improperly classified billions of barrels of reserves as proven instead of probable or possible. Shell's admission shows just how muddied reserve data can be, analysts say; the reserves it reclassified are real, but they will not be developed for years because of technical and political problems, so they should not be called proven. In coming years, if those problems can be solved, Shell may be able to once again classify them as proven, said Jennifer Rowland, senior oil analyst at J. P. Morgan.


"It's not like all of a sudden those assets are gone," Ms. Rowland said.


Mr. Simmons, the Houston investment banker, said that the output declines suggested that the companies needed to disclose more information about the performance of individual fields so that outside analysts could judge the companies' reserves estimates.


"What we have now is meaningless data," Mr. Simmons said. Big oil companies once prided themselves on conservative reserve estimates. But today, to justify multibillion-dollar investments in politically or technologically risky fields, companies have become much more aggressive, he said.


Gerald Kepes, managing director for PFC Energy, a consulting firm based in Washington and Paris, said that the slowdown in production underlined the transition period that big publicly traded energy companies face.


"The areas that have been long producing are really starting to become very mature," Mr. Kepes said. "For the integrated oil companies, more of the remaining reserves and reserve potential are in areas where the risks are higher."


Combined with a survey from the International Energy Agency that shows rising demand, the drop in production at the supermajors offers more evidence that energy prices may stay high for the foreseeable future, said Steven Pfeifer, senior oil analyst at Merrill Lynch.


"The data is starting to say that underlying all this, the supply-demand balance is tighter than we thought," Mr. Pfeifer said. "The maturing geological base is starting to rear its ugly head."

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company | Home | Privacy Policy | Search | Corrections | Help | Back to Top

Posted by gh at 09:08 AM | Comments (138)

June 09, 2004

Bush Blocks Foreign Press

Terrorism & Security | csmonitor.com

Foreign reporters cry foul

Reinstated visa requirements hinder journalists' access to US.

Version traduite de la page http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/0608/dailyUpdate.html

by Tom Regan | csmonitor.com

In March of 2003, the Guardian reported Saturday, as the new Department of Homeland Security (DHS) took over the duties of the immigration and naturalization service, officials in DHS decided to revive a visa requirement, dormant since 1952, that required journalists to apply for a special visa, known as an I-visa, when visiting the United States for professional reasons. This visa requirement also applied to so-called "friendly nations" – 27 countries whose citizens do not have to apply for a visa in order to visit the US for personal reasons.

Cri étranger de journalistes fétide

Les conditions rétablies de visa gênent l'accès des journalistes vers les USA.

par Tom Regan |csmonitor.com

En mars de 2003, le gardien a rapporté samedi, pendant que le nouveau département de la sécurité de patrie (CSAD) assurait les fonctions du service d'immigration et de naturalisation , des fonctionnaires dans le CSAD a décidé de rétablir une condition de visa, dormante depuis 1952, qui a exigé des journalistes de s'appliquer pour un visa spécial, connu comme Je-visa, en visitant les Etats-Unis pour des raisons professionnelles. Cette condition de visa s'est également appliquée aux prétendus pays du  27 "de nations amicales" dont les citoyens ne doivent pas solliciter un visa afin de visiter les USA pour des raisons personnelles.

Mais le gardien rapporte, la décision pour remettre en marche la condition de visa est tellement peu connue que (et Américain) les journalistes les plus étrangers n'ont aucune idée qu'elle existe même. En conséquence, l'année dernière 15 journalistes "des nations amicales" (Britian, l'Australie et d'autres) ont été expulsés des USA . Douze de ces déportations se sont produits à l'aéroport international de Los Angeles.

L'auteur Elena Lappin, sur une tâche indépendante pour le gardien , est tombé victime à cette nouvelle condition de visa dedans que première mme. Lappin de mai, qui est mariée à un Américain et dont la fille est américaine, a écrite dans le gardien ce week-end passé au sujet de son expérience . Lappin indique qu'elle était fingerprinted, handcuffed, dépouiller-recherché, et tenu dans le dentention pendant 26 heures. Son crime: elle avait signé le visa I-94 hésitent forme , (une exemption permettant la plupart des résidants des 27 "" les pays amicaux pour visiter les Etats-Unis pour des affaires ou le plaisir pendant jusqu'à 90 jours), sans la communication préalable de la copie fine qui a indiqué qu'elle n'entrait pas dans les USA comme représentant des médias étrangers.

Posted by gh at 10:27 AM | Comments (195)

June 08, 2004

First They Arrest the Intellectual

Terrorism & Security | csmonitor.com

Artist falls afoul of Patriot Act

Artist's use of 'harmless' bacteria spurs investigation

by Tom Regan | csmonitor.com

In a highly unusual use of the USA Patriot Act, which its creators say was designed to prevent terrorist attacks in the United States, The New York Times reports that three artists have been served subpoenas to appear before a federal grand jury June 15. The grand jury is considering whether or not to charge Stephen Kurtz, an art professor at the University of Buffalo whose art involves the use of biology equipment, with "possession of biological agents."

Afoul de chutes d'artiste de Loi de patriote

L'utilisation de l'artiste 'de la recherche inoffensive de dents de bactéries

par Tom Regan |csmonitor.com

Artist falls afoul of Patriot Act

Artist's use of 'harmless' bacteria spurs investigation

by Tom Regan | csmonitor.com

In a highly unusual use of the USA Patriot Act, which its creators say was designed to prevent terrorist attacks in the United States, The New York Times reports that three artists have been served subpoenas to appear before a federal grand jury June 15. The grand jury is considering whether or not to charge Stephen Kurtz, an art professor at the University of Buffalo whose art involves the use of biology equipment, with "possession of biological agents."

Mr. Kurtz's problems with the Patriot Act began in May when he dialed 911 to report his wife of 20 years was unresponsive. When paramedics came to his house, one of them noticed that Kurtz had laboratory equipment, which he used in his art exhibits. The paramedics reported this to police and the FBI sealed off his house.

Authorities later said that Kurtz's wife had died of "heart failure," but he wasn't allowed to return to his home for two days while the FBI confiscated his equipment, and biological samples. They also carted off his books, personal papers and computer. Eventually his home was declared "not a danger to public health," but the FBI did not return his equipment.

06/04/04

Troop strain renews draft debate
06/03/04

Ahmed Chalabi: Spy or victim?
06/02/04

Transition countdown

Sign up to be notified daily:

Find out more.


Kurtz founded the Critical Art Ensemble, an artists' collective that produces artwork to educate the public about the politics of biotechnology. The group has used "harmless" transgenic [genetically modified] forms of the E.coli bacteria [some strains of E.coli can be deadly] in past exhibits. A member of the collective, Beatriz da Costa, an art professor at the University of California, Irvine, said the FBI served her a subpoena last week to appear at the grand jury hearing.

Ms. da Costa told the Times that the bacteria was produced legally in "cooperation with a microbiology lab in Pittsburgh to create a transgenic E. coli that was completely harmless." In an interview with newbrainframe.org, an Italian art website, she said she found the subpeona alarming.
"I have no idea why they're continuing (to investigate)," said da Costa, one of those subpoenaed. "It was shocking that this investigation was ever launched. That it is continuing is positively frightening, and shows how vulnerable the PATRIOT Act has made freedom of speech in this country."
The Washington Post reports that other people who know Kurtz have also been questioned. Adele Henderson, chair of the art department of the State University of New York at Buffalo, says that on May 21 the FBI "asked her about Kurtz's art, his writings, his books; why his organization (the art ensemble) is listed as a collective rather than by its individual members; how it is funded."

The New York Times reports that an FBI spokesman, Paul Moskal, referred all questions to the United States attorney's office in Buffalo. William J. Hochul Jr., the lead terrorism prosecutor for the office, declined to comment on the case, citing Justice Department policy regarding current investigations.

Many US attorneys say they strongly believe in the act. CrainsCleveland.com, a Cleveland business website, reports that US Attorney Greg White said "the law is the best defense against terrorists looking to kill as many Americans as possible."
Mr. White said that many of the act’s more controversial provisions, such as wiretaps, are tactics that have been used for decades against organized crime figures and drug pushers. The law simply allowed prosecutors and police to use the same methods against terrorists, he said.
Certain provisions of the Patriot Act will expire in December of 2005, although the Bush administrations wants those provisions extended and new ones added. The Times Record of Washington state reports that President Bush's re-election campaign pushed the Patriot Act last week, calling on governors and state attorneys general to support it publicly. The Olympian, of Seattle, reports that three supporters of the act spoke on its behalf last Thursday.
"What has happened is it has become a political symbol for those who want to criticize the current administration," charged King County Prosecutor Norm Maleng, speaking at a news conference with former US Attorney Mike McKay and former New York City Police Commissioner Bernard Kerik. Maleng also said that "most people who criticize the Patriot Act have never read it." And he declared that "the evidence is clear that we are not immune to the worldwide threat of terror."
Newsweek reports on how even the act of buying a house, or even getting a home equity loan, now comes under the scope of the Patriot Act. The Associated Press reports on how an ex-con from Nebraska, who has been out of jail and out of trouble for 15 years, is being affected by the Patriot Act. Bruce Lingenfelter, a former University of Nebraska foootball player, said he had no trouble finding work as a heavy equipment operator and a steam fitter in the Seattle area, where he now lives, until the Patriot Act came long. Because he was convicted of a felony drug charge, he cannot work on any federal project, which he had done in the years preceding 9/11.

Well-known civil libertarian Nat Hentoff wrote recently in the Village Voice that even the Justice Department believes they are "losing the fight" over the Patriot Act. And some of those who are the most opposed to renewing sections of the Patriot Act, Mr. Hentoff writes, come from the Republican Party.
Bush is pressing hard for Congress to renew those parts now. Standing in his way, however, is Republican conservative James Sensenbrenner, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee. According to The Hill: "Sensenbrenner has made it clear to colleagues that he will not consider reauthorization of the bill until next year."
The Bill of Rights Defense Committee reports on its website that 322 cities and counties and four states have passed resolutions against the Patriot Act. A survey of 65 US criminal justice and legal experts released in late April by legal publishing firm Thomas Wadsworth found that 95 percent felt that the act was passed too quickly. Seventy-four percent felt the act violates individual rights and 68 percent felt that existing laws could be used to protect the nation from terrorism. All of the repondents believed the US federal government had a role to play in protecting the country against terrorism.
"My biggest overall concern for an act as sweeping and as important as this one is that it wasn’t vetted for very long. There wasn't a lot of national discussion," says Gary LaFree, professor of criminology and criminal justice and co-founder of the Democracy Collaborative at the University of Maryland in College Park, one of the respondents. "You end up seemingly being on the side of Saddam [Hussein] if you say, wait a second here. [But] this act has some implications that we think we should think through a little more."

Afoul de chutes d'artiste de Loi de patriote

L'utilisation de l'artiste 'de la recherche inoffensive de dents de bactéries

par Tom Regan |csmonitor.com

Dans une utilisation fortement peu commune de la Loi de patriote des Etats-Unis , que ses créateurs disent a été conçu pour empêcher des attaques de terroriste aux Etats-Unis, New York chronomètre des rapports que trois artistes ont été servis des citations à apparaître avant juin de fortune grand fédéral 15. Le jury grand considère si pour ne pas charger Stephen Kurtz, un professeur d'art à l'université de Buffalo dont l'art comporte l'utilisation de l'équipement de biologie, de l'"possession des agents biologiques."

Les problèmes de M. Kurtz's avec l'acte de patriote ont commencé en mai où il a composé 911 pour rapporter son épouse de 20 ans était insensible. Quand le paramedics est venu à sa maison, un d'eux a noté que Kurtz a eu l'équipement de laboratoire, qu'il a employé dans ses objets exposés d'art. Le paramedics a rapporté ceci à la police et le FBI a isolé sa maison .

Les autorités plus tard ont indiqué que l'épouse de Kurtz était morte du l'"arrêt du coeur," mais il n'a pas été permis de retourner à sa maison pour deux jours tandis que le FBI confisquait son équipement, et échantillons biologiques. Ils carted également outre de ses livres, papiers personnels et ordinateur. Par la suite sa maison n'a été déclarée "pas un danger à la santé publique," mais au FBI n'a pas renvoyé son équipement.

06/04/04

La contrainte de troupe remplace la discussion d'ébauche
06/03/04

Ahmed Chalabi: Espion ou victime?
06/02/04

Compte à rebours de transition

On annonce quotidiennement le signe jusqu'à:

Découvrez plus .


Kurtz a fondé l'ensemble critique d'art, les artistes collectifs qui produit le dessin-modèle pour instruire le public au sujet de la politique de la biotechnologie. Le groupe a employé les formes [ génétiquement modifiées ] transgenic "inoffensives" des bactéries d'E.coli [ quelques contraintes d'E.coli peuvent être mortelles ] dedans après des objets exposés. Un membre du collectif, da Costa, un professeur de Beatriz d'art à l'université de la Californie, Irvine, a dit que le FBI lui a servi une citation la semaine dernière pour apparaître à l'audition de fortune grande.

Le da Costa de mme. a indiqué aux temps que les bactéries ont été produites légalement en "collaboration avec un laboratoire de microbiologie à Pittsburgh pour créer un E. transgenic coli qui était complètement inoffensif." Dans une entrevue avec newbrainframe.org , un website italien d'art, elle a dit qu'elle a trouvé alarmer de subpeona .
"je n'ai aucune idée pourquoi ils continuent (pour étudier)," da Costa, un de ceux cité. "il choquait que cette recherche a été jamais lancée. Qu'il continue est franchement effrayant, et montre comment vulnérable l'acte de PATRIOTE a fait la liberté du discours dans ce pays."
Le poteau de Washington signale que d'autres qui connaissent Kurtz ont été également interrogées . Adele Henderson, chaise du département d'art de l'université de l'Etat de New York à Buffalo, indique que mai 21 le FBI "l'a interrogée au sujet de l'art de Kurtz, ses écritures, ses livres; pourquoi son organisation (l'ensemble d'art) est énumérée en tant que membres collectifs plutôt que par ses différents; comment elle est placée."

New York chronomètre des signaux qu'un porte-parole de FBI, Paul Moskal, s'est référé toutes les questions au bureau du mandataire des Etats-Unis à Buffalo. Jr. de William J. Hochul, le procureur de terrorisme de fil pour le bureau, refusé pour commenter le cas, citant la politique de département de justice concernant des investigations courantes.

Beaucoup de mandataires des USA disent qu'ils croient fortement en acte. CrainsCleveland.com , un website d'affaires de Cleveland, signale que dit blanc de Greg de mandataire des USA "la loi est la meilleure défense contre des terroristes regardant pour tuer autant d'Américains comme possible."
M. White a dit que plusieurs des dispositions plus controversées d'act?s, comme met, est la tactique qui ont été employées pendant des décennies contre les chiffres de crime et les poussoirs organisés de drogue. Les procureurs et la police simplement permis de loi pour employer les mêmes méthodes contre des terroristes, il a dit.
Certaines dispositions de la Loi de patriote expireront en décembre de 2005, bien que les administrations de buisson veuille ces dispositions prolongées et neufs supplémentaires . Le disque de périodes de l'état de Washington Signale que la campagne de réelection du Président Bush's a poussé la Loi de patriote la semaine dernière, invitant des gouverneurs et des mandataires d'état généraux à la soutenir publiquement. L'Olympian , de Seattle, signale que trois défenseurs de l'acte ont parlé de son nom le jeudi passé.
"ce qui s'est produite est lui est devenue un symbole politique pour ceux qui veulent critiquer l'administration courante," le Roi chargé County Prosecutor Norm Maleng, parlant à une conférence de nouvelles avec l'ancien microphone McKay et ancien commissaire Bernard Kerik de mandataire des USA de police de New York City. Maleng a également indiqué que "la plupart des personnes qui critiquent la Loi de patriote ne l'ont jamais lue." Et il a déclaré que "l'évidence est claire que nous ne sommes pas immunisés contre la menace mondiale de la terreur."
Newsweek rend compte sur la façon dont même l'acte d'acheter une maison , ou même d'obtenir un prêt à la maison de capitaux propres, relève maintenant de la portée de la Loi de patriote. Les rapports de pression associés sur la façon dont un ex-con du Nébraska, qui a été hors de prison et hors d'ennui pendant 15 années, est affecté par la Loi de patriote . Bruce Lingenfelter, une ancienne université de joueur de foootball du Nébraska, dite il n'a eu aucun ennui trouvant le travail en tant qu'un opérateur lourd d'équipement et assembleur de vapeur dans la région de Seattle, où il vit maintenant, jusqu'à ce que l'acte de patriote soit venu longtemps. Puisqu'il a été condamné d'une charge de drogue de crime, il ne peut pas ne travailler sur aucun projet fédéral, qu'il avait fait en années précédant 9/11.

Hentoff national libertarian civil bien connu a écrit récemment dans la voix de village que même le département de justice croit qu'ils " perdent le combat " au-dessus de la Loi de patriote et certaines de ceux qui sont les sections remplaçantes plus opposées de la Loi de patriote, M. Hentoff écrit, vient de la partie républicaine.
Le buisson serre dur pour que le congrès remplace ces pièces maintenant. Se tenir de sa manière, cependant, est James conservateur républicain Sensenbrenner, Président du Comité de l'ordre judiciaire de Chambre. Selon la colline: "Sensenbrenner a expliqué aux collègues qu'il ne considérera pas le reauthorization de la facture avant l'année prochaine."
La déclaration des droits le comité de défense rend compte de son website que 322 villes et comtés et quatre états ont passé des résolutions contre l'acte de patriote . Un aperçu de juge criminel de 65 USA et de jurisconsultes a libéré en avril par Thomas ferme d'édition juridique que Wadsworth a constaté que 95 pour cent ont estimé que l'acte a été passé trop rapidement . Soixante-quatorze pour cent ont jugé que l'acte viole différentes droites et 68 pour cent ont estimé que des lois existantes pourraient être employées pour protéger la nation contre le terrorisme. Tous les repondents ont cru que le gouvernement fédéral des USA a eu un rôle à jouer en protégeant le pays contre le terrorisme.
"mon plus grand souci global pour un acte aussi rapide et aussi important que celui-ci est que ce wasn?t contrôlé pour très longtemps. Il n'y avait pas beaucoup de discussion nationale, "dit Gary LaFree, professeur de criminology et de juge et de Co-fondateur criminels de la démocratie de collaboration à l'université du Maryland en parc d'université, un des répondants. "vous finissez vers le haut apparemment d'être du côté de Saddam [ Hussein ] si vous dites, attendez une seconde ici. [ mais ] cet acte a quelques implications que nous pensons que nous devrions penser par peu davantage."

Posted by gh at 10:18 AM | Comments (42)

Nevermind That It's Immoral, It Perfectly Legal!

The New York Times > Washington > Lawyers Decided Bans on Torture Didn't Bind Bush

Lawyers Decided Bans on Torture Didn't Bind Bush
By NEIL A. LEWIS and ERIC SCHMITT


WASHINGTON, June 7, 2004. A team of administration lawyers concluded in a March 2003 legal memorandum that President Bush was not bound by either an international treaty prohibiting torture or by a federal antitorture law because he had the authority as commander in chief to approve any technique needed to protect the nation's security.

Juin 8, 2004


Les avocats ont décidé que les interdictions de la torture n'ont pas lié le buisson
Par NEIL A. LEWIS et ERIC SCHMITT

WASHINGTON, Juin 7, 2004. Une équipe d'avocats d'administration a conclu dans un mémorandum légal de mars 2003 que le Président Bush n'a pas été lié par une torture d'interdiction de traité international ou par une loi fédérale d'antitorture parce qu'il a eu l'autorité pendant que le commandant dans le chef pour approuver n'importe quelle technique devait protéger la sécurité de la nation.

Juin 8, 2004


Les avocats ont décidé que les interdictions de la torture n'ont pas lié le buisson
Par NEIL A. LEWIS et ERIC SCHMITT

WASHINGTON, Juin 7, 2004. Une équipe d'avocats d'administration a conclu dans un mémorandum légal de mars 2003 que le Président Bush n'a pas été lié par une torture d'interdiction de traité international ou par une loi fédérale d'antitorture parce qu'il a eu l'autorité pendant que le commandant dans le chef pour approuver n'importe quelle technique devait protéger la sécurité de la nation.


La note, préparée pour le secrétaire Donald H. Rumsfeld de la défense, a également indiqué que tous les fonctionnaires exécutifs de branche, y compris ceux dans les militaires, pourraient être immunisés des prohibitions domestiques et internationales contre la torture pour une variété de raisons.


Une raison, les avocats dits, serait si le personnel militaire croyait qu'ils agissaient sur des ordres des supérieurs "à moins qu'où la conduite disparaît autant que pour être patently illégale."


"afin de respecter l'autorité constitutionnelle inhérente du président pour contrôler une campagne militaire," les avocats ont écrit dans le mémorandum 56-page confidentiel, la prohibition contre la torture "doivent être interprétés comme inapplicable à l'interrogation entreprise conformément à sa autorité de commandant-dans-chef."


Les fonctionnaires aînés du Pentagone lundi ont cherché à réduire au minimum la signification de la note de mars, un de plusieurs obtenus par les temps de New York, comme analyse légale d'intérim qui n'a eu aucun effet sur les procédures révisées d'interrogation qui M. Rumsfeld approuvé en avril 2003 pour la prison militaire américaine au compartiment de Guantánamo, Cuba.


"le document d'avril était au sujet des techniques d'interrogation et des procédures," a dit Laurent Di Rita, le porte-parole en chef du Pentagone. "ce n'était pas une analyse légale."


M. Di Rita a dit les 24 procédures d'interrogation autorisées chez Guantánamo, dont quatre ont exigé l'approbation explicite de M. Rumsfeld's, n'ont pas constitué la torture et étaient conformés aux traités internationaux.


Le mémorandum de mars, qui a été rapporté la première fois par le journal de Wall Street lundi, est la dernière étude légale interne à révéler qui prouve qu'après les attaques de terroriste septembre de 11 les avocats de l'administration ont été placés pour travailler pour trouver des arguments légaux pour éviter des restrictions imposées par loi internationale et américaine.


Janv. 22, 2002, mémorandum du département de justice qui a fourni des arguments pour conserver des fonctionnaires américains de l'remplissage des crimes de guerre pour les prisonniers de manière ont été détenus et interrogé a été employé intensivement comme base pour le mémorandum de mars sur éviter des proscriptions contre la torture.


Le mémorandum précédemment révélé de département de justice a conclu que des fonctionnaires d'administration ont été justifiés en affirmant que les conventions de Genève ne se sont pas appliquées aux détenus à partir de la guerre de l'Afghanistan.


Un autre mémorandum obtenu par les temps indique que la plupart des avocats supérieurs de l'administration, excepté ceux au département d'état et aux chefs du personnel communs, ont approuvé la position du département de justice que les conventions de Genève ne se sont pas appliquée à la guerre en Afghanistan. En outre, ce mémorandum, daté du fév. 2, 2002, remarquable que les avocats pour l'agence d'intelligence centrale avaient demandé une compréhension explicite que l'engagement public de l'administration à respecter l'esprit des conventions ne s'est pas appliquée à ses employés.


La note de mars, dont une copie a été obtenue par les temps, a été préparée en tant qu'élément d'un examen des techniques d'interrogation par un groupe de travail désigné par les avocats-conseils généraux du département de la défense, William J. Haynes. Le groupe lui-même a été mené par les avocats-conseils généraux de l'Armée de l'Air, la marcheuse de Mary, et les avocats militaires et civils inclus à partir de toutes les branches des forces armées.


La revue a provenu des inquiétudes soulevées par des avocats de Pentagon et des interrogateurs chez Guantánamo après que M. Rumsfeld ait approuvé un ensemble des techniques plus dures d'interrogation en décembre 2002 pour employer sur un détenu saoudien, Al-Kahtani de Mohamed, on a pensé que qui est le 20ème pirate de l'air prévu dans la parcelle de terrain de terreur septembre de 11.


M. Rumsfeld a suspendu les techniques plus dures, y compris servir la nourriture froide et préemballée de détenu au lieu des rations chaudes et le rasage outre de ses cheveux faciaux, janv. 12, en attendant les résultats de la revue du groupe de travail. GEN. James T. Hill, chef de l'ordre méridional des militaires, qui surveille Guantánamo, a indiqué à des journalistes le vendredi passé que le groupe de travail "a voulu pour faire ce qui est humanitaire et ce qui est légal et conformé non seulement" aux conventions de Genève, mais également "ce qui est exact pour nos soldats."


M. Di Rita a dit que les fonctionnaires du Pentagone ont été concentrés principalement sur les techniques d'interrogation, et que le raisonnement légal inclus dans la note de mars a été la plupart du temps préparé par le bureau de département de justice et d'avocat-conseil Maison Blanche.


La note a prouvé que non seulement les avocats des départements de la défense et de justice et Maison Blanche ont approuvé la politique mais également que David S. Addington, l'avocat-conseil à vice-président Dick Cheney, également a été impliqué dans les discussions. L'avocat de département d'état, William H. Taft IV, dissented, avertissant qu'une telle position affaiblirait les protections des conventions de Genève pour les troupes américaines.


Le document mars de 6 au sujet de la torture fournit des définitions étroitement construites de torture. Par exemple, si un interrogateur "sait que la douleur grave résultera de ses actions, si entraînant un tel mal n'est pas son objectif, il manque de l'intention spécifique requise quoique le défendeur n'ait pas agi en bonne foi," le rapport dit. "à la place, un défendeur est coupable de la torture seulement s'il agit avec le but exprès d'infliger la douleur grave ou de la souffrance sur une personne dans sa commande."


L'adjectif "grave," il a indiqué, "fait tout simplement ce l'infliction de la douleur ou de la souffrance intrinsèquement, s'il est physique ou mental, est insuffisant s'élever le rapport à la torture. Au lieu de cela, le texte fournit que la douleur ou la souffrance doit être ` grave.' "le rapport a également conseillé que si un interrogateur" a une croyance de bonne foi ses actions n'auront pas comme conséquence le mal mental prolongé, il manque de l'état mental nécessaire pour ses actions pour constituer la torture."


Le rapport a également indiqué que les interrogateurs pourraient justifier ouvrir une brèche des lois ou des traités en appelant la doctrine de la nécessité. Un interrogateur employant les techniques qui causent le mal pourrait être immunisé de la responsabilité s'il "croyait à l'heure actuelle que son acte est nécessaire et conçu pour éviter un plus grand mal."


Scott Horton, l'ancienne tête du comité de droits de l'homme de l'association de la barre de la ville de New York, a indiqué lundi qu'il a cru que le mémorandum de mars sur éviter la responsabilité de la torture était ce qui causé une délégation des avocats militaires pour lui rendre visite et à se plaindre en privé au sujet des arguments légaux confidentiels de l'administration. Cette visite a dit-il eu comme conséquence l'association entreprenant une étude et une publication d'un rapport critiquant l'administration. Il a ajouté que les avocats qui ont rédigé la note de torture en mars pourraient faire face à des sanctions professionnelles.


Jamie Fellner, directeur des programmes des Etats-Unis pour la montre de droits de l'homme, a indiqué lundi, "nous croyons que cette note prouve qu'aux niveaux les plus élevés du Pentagone il y avait un intérêt en employant la torture comme un désir d'éluder les conséquences criminelles de faire ainsi."


Le mémorandum de mars contient également une section curieuse dans laquelle les avocats ont argué du fait qu'aucune torture commise chez Guantánamo ne serait une violation de anti-torturent le statut parce que la base était sous la juridiction légale américaine et la torture de soucis de statut seulement a commis outre-mer. Que la vue est en conflit direct avec la position l'administration a pris dans la cour suprême, où elle a argué du fait que les prisonniers au compartiment de Guantánamo ne ont pas droit aux protections constitutionnelles parce que la base est juridiction américaine extérieure.


Reportage contribué par Zernike de Kate pour cet article.

Posted by gh at 09:08 AM | Comments (41)

June 07, 2004

Death of Reagan will help Bush

June 7, 2004


Reagan Legacy Looming Large Over Campaign
By ADAM NAGOURNEY

WASHINGTON, June 6 — From the shores of Normandy to President Bush's campaign offices outside Washington, Mr. Bush and his political advisers embraced the legacy of Ronald Reagan on Sunday, suggesting that even in death, Mr. Reagan had one more campaign in him — this one at the side of Mr. Bush.


In France, Mr. Bush heralded the late president as a "gallant leader in the cause of freedom," and lionized him in an interview with Tom Brokaw. In Washington, Mr. Bush's aides said that it was Ronald Reagan as much as another president named Bush who was the role model for this president, and they talked of a campaign in which Mr. Reagan would be at least an inspirational presence.


Senator John Kerry of Massachusetts, Mr. Bush's likely Democratic challenger, was no less warm in praising Mr. Reagan, with a speech and a tribute on his Web site. Mr. Kerry's campaign canceled five days of events, in what aides described as both a gesture of respect to Mr. Reagan and a bow to the reality that the world would not be paying much attention to Mr. Kerry this week.


Mr. Bush's advisers said Sunday that the intense focus on Mr. Reagan's career that began upon the news of his death on Saturday would remind Americans of what Mr. Bush's supporters have long described as the similarities between the two men as straight-talking, ideologically driven leaders with swagger and a fixed idea of what they wanted to do with their office.


"Americans are going to be focused on President Reagan for the next week," said Ed Gillespie, the Republican national chairman. "The parallels are there. I don't know how you miss them."


Even some Democrats said they were concerned that the death of Mr. Reagan would provide a welcome, if perhaps temporary, tonic for a president who had been going through tough political times.


"I've been dreading this every election year for three cycles," said Jim Jordan, Mr. Kerry's former campaign manager. "Bush has totally attached himself to Ronald Reagan. He's going to turn Reagan into his own verifier."


Still, Mr. Kerry's aides said they believed Mr. Reagan's death would be, as a political matter, far in the background by the summer. And Republicans said there were risks in too conspicuously invoking Mr. Reagan as part of Mr. Bush's campaign.


Advisers to Mr. Bush said they had not determined how prominently Mr. Bush should identify his presidency with Mr. Reagan, whether Mr. Reagan's image should be incorporated in Mr. Bush's advertisements and whether Nancy Reagan might appear on Mr. Bush's behalf in the fall.


Some Republicans said the images of a forceful Mr. Reagan giving dramatic speeches on television provided a less-than-welcome contrast with Mr. Bush's own appearances these days, and that it was not in Mr. Bush's interest to encourage such comparisons. That concern was illustrated on Sunday, one Republican said, by televised images of Mr. Reagan's riveting speech in Normandy commemorating D-Day in 1984, followed by Mr. Bush's address at a similar ceremony on Sunday.


"Reagan showed what high stature that a president can have — and my fear is that Bush will look diminished by comparison," said one Republican sympathetic to Mr. Bush, who did not want to be quoted by name criticizing the president.


Another senior Republican expressed concern that by identifying too closely with Mr. Reagan, Mr. Bush risked running a campaign that looked to the past, which this adviser described as a recipe for a loss.


Several Republicans added that Mr. Bush's hopes of enlisting Mrs. Reagan might be complicated by the differences between Mrs. Reagan and Mr. Bush on the issue of embryonic stem-cell research. Mrs. Reagan has been vocal in arguing that the research might help others suffering from Alzheimer's disease, which doctors diagnosed in Mr. Reagan after he left office, while Mr. Bush's policy restricts public financing for this kind of research to existing cell lines.


Mr. Bush's advisers said that Mrs. Reagan — who gave a powerful and well-received speech at the Republican convention in 1996 — would not appear at the party's convention in New York this summer, but they would not say whether that was their desire or Mrs. Reagan's.


Aides to Mr. Bush and Mr. Kerry said they did not want to do anything that would make it appear that they were exploiting the news of Mr. Reagan's death. But in one sign of what may lie ahead, Republicans circulated old quotes from Mr. Kerry in which he criticized Mr. Reagan. Democrats promptly dug up instances of the first president Bush speaking unkindly about Mr. Reagan in 1980, as the two men competed for the Republican nomination.


Mr. Bush often invokes Mr. Reagan in his speeches, by saying that he has put in place the largest tax cuts since Mr. Reagan was in office.


"In many ways, George W. Bush and the policies that he put forward stand on the shoulders of Ronald Reagan," Ken Mehlman, Mr. Bush's campaign manager, said Sunday in discussing the connections between the two presidents. "Ronald Reagan was someone who believed and viewed the Soviet Union with moral clarity, who understood that peace came through strength and who believed at a time when a lot of people didn't agree with him that the key to prosperity in this country was to trust the American people."


Republicans said that the examination of Mr. Reagan's life would animate their party's attempt to draw a contrast between Mr. Bush, whom they describe as committed and decisive, and Mr. Kerry, whom they have sought to portray as vacillating.


Whatever its long-term political effect, Mr. Reagan's death froze in place what had seemed to be an unabating campaign for president. Beyond Mr. Kerry's decision to cancel his public events this week, the Democratic National Committee postponed two fund-raising concerts, one in Los Angeles and one in New York, that had been scheduled for the days ahead. Mr. Bush's aides said they had suspended a series of appearances this week by surrogates of Mr. Bush, including Bernard B. Kerik, the former New York City police commissioner, attacking Mr. Kerry for raising questions about the antiterrorism law known as the USA Patriot Act.


Mr. Kerry's aides said that they saw little point in even trying to campaign this week, before a funeral in which Mr. Bush was likely to speak.


"We think it's respectful, and No. 2, I don't think we're going to get any coverage," said Mr. Kerry's deputy campaign manager, Steve Elmendorf.


One senior Democratic Party official, who declined to be identified, said that that might not be such a bad thing.


"It's going to overshadow Kerry and Bush for the entire week," this official said. "It must be a welcome respite to reporters, pols and voters alike."

Posted by gh at 10:44 AM | Comments (1)

June 03, 2004

Fundamentalist Bush

The New York Times > Washington > Campaign 2004 > Bush Campaign Seeks Help From Thousands of Congregations

Bush Campaign Seeks Help From Thousands of Congregations
By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK

The Bush campaign is seeking to enlist thousands of religious congregations around the country in distributing campaign information and registering voters, according to an e-mail message sent to many members of the clergy and others in Pennsylvania.

Version Français la bas.

June 3, 2004


Bush Campaign Seeks Help From Thousands of Congregations
By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK


The Bush campaign is seeking to enlist thousands of religious congregations around the country in distributing campaign information and registering voters, according to an e-mail message sent to many members of the clergy and others in Pennsylvania.


Liberal groups charged that the effort invited violations of the separation of church and state and jeopardized the tax-exempt status of churches that cooperated. Some socially conservative church leaders also said they would advise pastors against participating in such a partisan effort.


But Steve Schmidt, a spokesman for the Bush administration, said "people of faith have as much right to participate in the political process as any other community" and that the e-mail message was about "building the most sophisticated grass-roots presidential campaign in the country's history."


In the message, dated early Tuesday afternoon, Luke Bernstein, coalitions coordinator for the Bush campaign in Pennsylvania, wrote: "The Bush-Cheney '04 national headquarters in Virginia has asked us to identify 1,600 `Friendly Congregations' in Pennsylvania where voters friendly to President Bush might gather on a regular basis."


In each targeted "place of worship," Mr. Bernstein continued, without mentioning a specific religion or denomination, "we'd like to identify a volunteer who can help distribute general information to other supporters." He explained: "We plan to undertake activities such as distributing general information/updates or voter registration materials in a place accessible to the congregation."


The e-mail message was provided to The New York Times by a group critical of President Bush.


The campaign's effort is the latest indication of its heavy bet on churchgoers in its bid for re-election. Mr. Bush's top political adviser, Karl Rove, and officials of Mr. Bush's campaign have often said that people who attended church regularly voted for him disproportionately in the last election, and the campaign has made turning out that group a top priority this year. But advisers to Mr. Bush also acknowledge privately that appearing to court socially conservative Christian voters too aggressively risks turning off more moderate voters.


What was striking about the Pennsylvania e-mail message was its directness. Both political parties rely on church leaders — African-American pastors for the Democrats, for example, and white evangelical Protestants for the Republicans — to urge congregants to go the polls. And in the 1990's, the Christian Coalition developed a reputation as a political powerhouse by distributing voters guides in churches that alerted conservative believers to candidates' position on social issues like abortion and school prayer. But the Christian Coalition was organized as a nonpartisan, issue-oriented lobbying and voter-education organization, and in 1999 it ran afoul of federal tax laws for too much Republican partisanship.


The Bush campaign, in contrast, appeared to be reaching out directly to churches and church members, seeking to distribute campaign information as well as ostensibly nonpartisan material, like issue guides and registration forms.


Trevor Potter, a Washington lawyer and former chairman of the Federal Election Commission, said the campaign's solicitation raised delicate legal issues for congregations.


"If the church is doing it, it is a legal problem the church," Mr. Potter said. "In the past, the I.R.S. has sought to revoke and has succeeded in revoking the tax-exempt status of churches for political activity."


If a member of the congregation is disseminating the information, however, the issue is more complicated. If the congregation had a table where anyone could make available any information whatsoever without any institutional responsibility or oversight, then a member might be able to distribute campaign literature without violating tax laws. But very few churches have such open forums, Mr. Potter said. "The I.R.S. would ask, did the church encourage this? Did the church permit this but not other literature? Did the church in any way support this?"


Mr. Bernstein, the e-mail message's author, declined to comment. Mr. Schmidt, the campaign spokesman, said the e-mail message only sought individual volunteers from among the "friendly congregations," not the endorsements of the any religious organizations or groups.


"The e-mail is targeted to individuals, asking individuals to become involved in the campaign and to share information about the campaign with other people in their faith community," Mr. Schmidt said. "Yesterday, a liberal judge from San Francisco overturned a partial-birth abortion ban which banned that abhorrent procedure. That is an example of an issue that people of faith from across the United States care about."


He said that the Pennsylvania e-mail message was part of a larger national effort. The number of congregations mentioned - 1,600 in just one state - suggests an operation on a vast scale.


But even some officials of some conservative religious groups said they were troubled by the notion that a parishioner might distribute campaign information within a church or at a church service.


"If I were a pastor, I would not be comfortable doing that," said Richard Land, president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention. "I would say to my church members, we are going to talk about the issues and we are going to take information from the platforms of the two parties about where they stand on the issues. I would tell them to vote and to vote their conscience, and the Lord alone is the Lord of the conscience."


The Rev. Barry Lynn, executive director of the liberal Americans United for Separation of Church and State, argued that any form of distributing campaign literature through a church would compromise its tax-exempt status. He called the effort "an absolutely breathtakingly large undertaking," saying, "I never thought anyone could so attempt to meld a political party with a network of religious organizations."


In a statement, Rev. Dr. C. Welton Gaddy, president of the Interfaith Alliance, a liberal group, called the effort "an astonishing abuse of religion" and "the rawest form of manipulation of religion for partisan gain." He urged the president to repudiate the effort.


In a statement, Mara Vanderslice, director of religious outreach for the Kerry campaign, said the effort "shows nothing but disrespect for the religious community." Ms. Vanderslice continued: "Although the Kerry campaign actively welcomes the participation of religious voices in our campaign, we will never court religious voters in a way that would jeopardize the sanctity of their very houses of worship."


How many congregations or worshippers will choose to cooperate remains to be seen. In an interview yesterday, the Rev. Ronald Fowlkes, pastor of the Victoria Baptist Church in Springfield, Pa., said he had not seen the e-mail message but did not think much of the idea.


"We encourage people to get out and vote," Mr. Fowlkes said, but as far as distributing information through church, "If it were focused on one party or person, that would be too much."


Juin 3, 2004


Aide de recherches de campagne de buisson des milliers de rassemblements
Par DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK

Le baguent la campagne cherche à enrôler des milliers de rassemblements religieux dans le pays dans l'information de distribution de campagne et enregistre des électeurs, selon un message de E-mail envoyé à beaucoup de membres du clergé et de d'autres en Pennsylvanie.


Les groupes libéraux ont chargé que l'effort a invité des violations de la séparation de l'église et de l'état et a compromis le statut exempt d'impôts des églises qui ont coopéré. Quelques chefs socialement conservateurs d'église ont également dit qu'ils conseilleraient des pastors contre participer à un effort si partisan.


Mais Steve Schmidt, un porte-parole pour l'administration de buisson, les "personnes de la foi ont autant bien pour participer au processus politique en tant que n'importe quelle autre communauté" et que le message de E-mail était au sujet d'"établir la campagne présidentielle des bases les plus sophistiquées dans l'histoire du pays."


Dans le message, daté mardi après-midi tôt, Luc Bernstein, coordonnateur de coalitions pour la campagne de buisson en Pennsylvanie, a écrit: "les sièges sociaux nationaux du Buisson-Cheney '04 en Virginie nous a demandés d'identifier 1.600 rassemblements amicaux de ` en Pennsylvanie où les électeurs amicaux au Président Bush pourraient se réunir de façon régulière."


Dans chaque "endroit visé de culte," M. Bernstein a continué, sans mentionner une religion spécifique ou dénomination, "nous voudrions identifier un volontaire qui peut aider à distribuer des informations générales à d'autres défenseurs." Il a expliqué: "nous projetons entreprendre des activités telles que distribuer information/updates général ou matériaux d'enregistrement d'électeur dans un endroit accessible au rassemblement."


Le message de E-mail a été fourni aux temps de New York par un groupe critique du Président Bush.


L'effort de la campagne est la dernière indication de son pari lourd sur des churchgoers dans son offre pour la réelection. Le conseiller de M. Bush's, la mèche de Karl, et les fonctionnaires politiques supérieurs de la campagne de M. Bush's ont souvent dit ces personnes qui est allée à l'église régulièrement votée pour lui d'une façon disproportionnée dans la dernière élection, et la campagne a fait s'avérer ce groupe une première priorité cette année. Mais les conseillers à M. Bush reconnaissent également en privé cela qui semble aller au devant des électeurs chrétiens socialement conservateurs risque trop agressivement de tourner outre des électeurs plus modérés.


Ce qui frappait au sujet du message de E-mail de la Pennsylvanie était sa droiture. Les deux parties politiques comptent sur des chefs d'église? Pastors Africain-Américains pour les démocrates, par exemple, et Protestants évangélique blanc pour les républicains? pour inviter des membres d'une congrégation à aller les scrutins. Et dans les années 90, la coalition chrétienne a développé une réputation comme centrale électrique politique en distribuant des guides d'électeurs dans les églises qui ont alerté des believers conservateurs à la position des candidats sur les questions sociales comme l'avortement et la prière d'école. Mais la coalition chrétienne a été organisée pendant qu'une organisation nonpartisan et issue-orientée d'incitation et d'électeur-éducation, et en 1999 il courait l'afoul des lois d'impôt pour trop de partisanship républicain.


La campagne de buisson, en revanche, a semblé atteindre dehors directement aux églises et aux membres d'église, cherchant à distribuer l'information de campagne aussi bien que le matériel en apparence nonpartisan, comme des guides d'issue et des fiches.


Le potier de Trevor, un avocat de Washington et l'ancien Président de l'élection fédérale commissionnent, ont dit les questions légales sensibles augmentées par sollicitation de la campagne pour des rassemblements.


"si l'église la fait, c'est un problème légal l'église," M. Potter dit. "dans le passé, l'cI.r.s. a cherché à retirer et a réussi à retirer le statut exempt d'impôts des églises pour l'activité politique."


Si un membre du rassemblement diffuse l'information, cependant, l'issue est plus compliquée. Si le rassemblement avait une table où n'importe qui pourrait faire disponible n'importe quelle information quelconques sans n'importe quelle responsabilité institutionnelle ou inadvertance, alors un membre pourrait pouvoir distribuer la littérature de campagne sans lois d'impôts de violation. Mais très peu d'églises ont de tels forum ouverts, M. Potter dit. "L'cI.r.s., l'église demanderait-elle a-t-elle encouragé ceci? L'église a-t-elle permis ceci mais non toute autre littérature? A fait l'église de quelque façon appui ceci?"


M. Bernstein, l'auteur du message de E-mail, refusé pour commenter. M. Schmidt, le porte-parole de campagne, a dit volontaires cherchés de message de E-mail seulement les différents de parmi "les rassemblements amicaux," pas les approbations de tous les organismes religieux ou des groupes.


"le E-mail est visé aux individus, demandant à des individus de devenir impliqués dans la campagne et de partager des informations sur la campagne avec d'autres dans leur communauté de foi," M. Schmidt dit. "hier, un juge libéral de San Francisco a retourné une interdiction d'avortement de partiel-naissance qui a interdit ce procédé répugnant. C'est un exemple d'une issue au sujet de la laquelle les gens de la foi de à travers le soin des Etats-Unis."


Il a dit que le message de E-mail de la Pennsylvanie faisait partie d'un plus grand effort national. Le nombre de rassemblements mentionnés - 1.600 dans juste un état - suggère une opération sur une vaste échelle.


Mais même quelques fonctionnaires de quelques groupes religieux conservateurs ont déclaré qu'ils ont été préoccupés par la notion qu'un paroissien pourrait distribuer l'information de campagne dans une église ou à un office.


"si j'étais un pastor, je ne serais pas confortable faisant cela," a dit la terre de Richard, président de l'éthique et de la Commission religieuse de liberté de la convention méridionale de baptiste. "je dirais à mes membres d'église, nous allons parler des issues et nous allons prendre l'information des plateformes des deux parties environ où elles se tiennent sur les questions. Je leur dirais que voter et voter leur seule conscience, et le seigneur est le seigneur de la conscience."


Rev. Barry Lynn, directeur exécutif des Américains libéraux unis pour la séparation de l'église et de l'état, arguée du fait que n'importe quelle forme de littérature de distribution de campagne par une église compromettrait son statut exempt d'impôts. Il a appelé l'effort "une entreprise absolument breathtakingly grande," énonciation, "I n'a jamais pensé que n'importe qui pourrait ainsi tentative au meld une partie politique avec un réseau des organismes religieux."


Dans un rapport, Dr. C. Welton Gaddy, président de l'alliance d'Interfaith, un groupe libéral d'inverseur, a appelé l'effort "un abus étonnant de religion" et "de la forme la plus crue de manipulation de religion pour le gain partisan." Il a invité le président à nier l'effort.


Dans un rapport, Mara Vanderslice, directeur de religieux dépassent pour la campagne de Kerry, a dit que l'effort "ne montre rien mais le disrespect pour la communauté religieuse." Mme. Vanderslice a continué: "bien que la campagne de Kerry fait bon accueil activement à la participation des voix religieuses dans notre campagne, nous ne irons jamais au devant des électeurs religieux d'une manière dont compromettrait la sainteté de leurs maisons mêmes de culte."


Combien de rassemblements ou de worshippers choisiront de coopérer les restes à voir. Dans une entrevue hier, Rev. Ronald Fowlkes, le pastor de l'église de baptiste de Victoria à Springfield, PA, a dit qu'il n'avait pas vu le message de E-mail mais n'a pas pensé une grande partie de l'idée.


"nous encourageons des personnes à sortir et la voix," M. Fowlkes dit, mais jusque l'information de distribution par l'église, "si elle étaient concentrées sur une partie ou personne, qui seraient trop."

Copyright 2004 New York Times Company | À la maison | Politique D'Intimité | Recherche | Corrections | Aide | De nouveau au dessus

Posted by gh at 11:13 AM | Comments (35)

June 02, 2004

La France enfin championne d'Europe et du monde.
France finally champion of Europe and the world.

In put into the serie "our very dear (expensive)* CEO ", here is new and instructive statistics extracted from the report of the parliament member Pascal Clément.

*french word game, "très cher" is both dear and expensive.
by Le Canard Enchaine ("The Chained Duck")
read it in english


Dans la séries "nos très chers PDG", voici de nouvelles et instructives statistiques extraites du rapport du parlementaire Pascal Clément.
par "Le Canard Enchaîné"

Dans la séries "nos très chers PDG", voici de nouvelles et instructives statistiques extraites du rapport du parlementaire Pascal Clément. Les salaires tout compris (bonus et avantages en nature) des 40 patrons hexagonaux dont les entreprises sont cotées au premier marché ont connu une hausse moyenne en 200 de 36%, en 2001 de 20%, en 2002 de 13%, et en 2003 de 11%. Ils sont les mieux payés en Europe: leur rémunération moyenne s'établit à 1.84 million d'euros, contre 1.54 en Angleterre, 1.37 aux Pays-Bas et 1 en Italie.

Les patrons français, déjà champions d'Europe en matière de salaires, sont également champions du monde des stock-options. La part des stock-options en pourcentage de leur rémunération annuelle atteint 64%, contre 45% chez les Américains, 30% chez les Allemands et 20% chez les Britanniques. Simple question de justice: il est bien connu que nos quarante premières entreprises sont beaucoup plus puissantes et performantes que les minables multinationales US cotées à Wall Street !

Les lecteurs du "Canard" connaissent déjà les cas de Jean-René Fourtou (18 millions de plus-values virtuelles sur stock-options en moins de dix-huit mois passés chez Vivendi) ou d'Igor Landau (+38.4% de salaire destinés sans doute à le remercier de s'être fait piquer sa firme Aventis par Sanofi). Il faut aussi saluer quelques exploits personnels. Le PDG de France Télécom, Thierry Breton -1.7 million d'euros de salaire en 2003-, a tenu à faire prendre en charge par son entreprise (publique) le coût de son conseiller fiscal, soit 10 000 euros par an. Il n'y a pas de petits profits.

Bernard Arnault, le PDG de LVMH, a décidé, lui, de ne rendre public le montant de sa rémunération qu'après en avoir retiré le montant de son impôt sur le revenu, de la CSG et de la CRDS. Selon les calculs effectués par "La Tribune" (21/05), elle atteint, en brut, la bagatelle de 4.4 millions d'euros. En hausse de 36% en 2003 par rapport à 2002. Mais il y a des pudeurs qu'il faut savoir respecter.

Dans la séries "les bonnes réussites", "Le Figaro" (06/05) a déniché un exemple éloquent. Grâce à un contrat particulièrement avantageux, Edouard de Royère, qui n'est plus PDG d'Air Liquide depuis 1995, encaisse chaque année 1.58 million d'euros, alors que l'actuel PDG, Benoît Potier, n'a droit qu'à... 1.68 million. Soit à peine 100 000 euros de plus que son prédécesseurs, qui ne gère plus Air Liquide depuis près de neuf ans.
Toutes nos félicitations à cet heureux retraité qui ne manque pas d'air, ni de liquide.

Posted by at 03:56 PM | Comments (137)

Charb n'aime pas les gens: Le prétexte religieux.
Charb does not love people: the religious pretext.

Extracted from the newspaper "Charlie Hebdo" this text is a part of the column(chronicle) of Charb, humorist illustrator without concessions. This article speaks about the mediatique practice in the trnasmission of the piece of information about the current conflicts... The translation may be indistinct.

Read it in auto-translated english.


Extrait du journal "Charlie Hebdo" ce texte fait partie de la chronique de Charb, dessinateur humoriste sans concessions. Cet article parle de la pratique mediatique dans la trnasmission de l'information à propos des conflits actuels... La traduction risque d'être imprécise.

Charb n'aime pas les gens: Le prétexte religieux.

Des soldats américains ont torturé et humilié des prisonniers irakiens. Ils les ont traités comme des objets. En voulant dépouiller les irakiens de leur humanité, les soldats américains n'ont fait que nier la leur.
Le commando se réclamant d'Al-Quaida qui s'est filmé en train d'égorger et de décapiter un citoyen américain voulait venger les sévices dont ont été victimes les prisonniers irakiens. En se comportant avec leur victime comme un boucher avec un animal d'abattage, ils se sont rapprochés de leurs ennemis de l'US Army. A leur tour, ils se sont mis en marge de l'humanité.

La même semaine à Gaza, un blindé israélien sautait sur une mine. Les six occupants du véhicule étaient tués. Des lambeaux de leurs corps déchiquetés étaient récupérés par des combattants du Hamas. Les fragments d'os et de membres sanguinolents étaient exhibés devant les caméras présentes sur les lieux, brandis comme des trophés et finalement cachés. Dans la tradition religieuse juive, un corps ne peut reposer en paix que si toutes les parties du corps sont inhumées. C'est pour ça que l'armée d'Israël déploie autant de moyens pour récupérer un soldat mort qu'un soldat vivant. C'est parce que les combattants palestiniens connaissent le caractère sacré qu'accorde la religion juive à ses morts qu'ils ont agi ainsi. Cette image atroce de types cagoulés manipulant de la chair humaine a été mise sur le même plan que l'égorgement de l'otage américain ou que les tortures dont ont été victimes les prisonniers irakiens. Ce lot d'horreurs a été vendu sous le titre générique de "barbaries au Proche-Orient". Tous ces actes dégueulasses ont un point commun: la religion.
Les soldats américains ont moins cherché à atteindre l'Irakien que le musulman en le foutant à poil devant des femmes et en le violant. Le commando d'Al-Quaida n'a pas tué son otage d'une balle dans la tête, il l'a égorgé comme un mouton de l'Aïd. Les bourreaux ont tenté de donner l'image d'un sacrifice religieux. Et on l'a vu, les militants du Hamas ont cherché à profaner les cadavres non pas de soldats, mais de Juifs.
Les raisons politiques, économiques, qui motivent essentiellement les conflits de la région sont toujours recouvertes d'un vernis religieux (alors que Bush veut contrôler le pétrole irakien, Israël veut la terre des Palestiniens, les Irakiens et les Palestiniens veulent leur autonomie et administrer leur territoire comme ils l'entendent. Il n'y a guère qu'Al-Quaida qui se batte pour de "vraies" raisons religieuses). Les cons qui servent de chair à canon dans ces guerres sont plus motivés si on leur dit qu'il s'agit de mourir pour Dieu et au nom "des valeurs de leur civilisation", plutôt que si on leur dit qu'ils doivent se sacrifier au nom des intérêts particuliers de leur gouvernants ou de leurs industriels.

On a donc l'impression en regardant la télé de n'assister qu'à des guerres de religion. Les images qu'on nous donne à voir sont celles de hyènes fanatisées qui n'ont de cesse de ridiculiser la religion de l'adversaire. Au lieu de nous montrer la carte des puits de pétrole en Irak, des réserves d'eau en Palestine, au lieu de nous expliquer le "dessous des cartes", comme le fait l'excellent Jean-Christophe Victore sur Arte [dans l'émission du même nom], au lieu de nous exposer les enjeux géopolitiques d'un conflit, on nous montre des abrutis sanguinaires qui pensent lutter pour la gloire de leur dieu, de leur race, de leur folklore pourri. Ils existent, il faut évidemment montrer cette réalité, mais ne résumer les conflits qu'à leur aspect religieux parce qu'on dispose d'images chocs sur le sujet, c'est prendre l'opinion pour une grande gosse un peu sotte.


Posted by at 03:34 PM | Comments (35)